Textbook Notes (368,794)
Canada (162,165)
Sociology (1,513)
SOC205H1 (16)
Chapter

Week 9 Readings

5 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC205H1
Professor
Brent Berry
Semester
Spring

Description
SOC205: Week 9  Chapter 11: The New Urban Political Economy – John Hannigan Introduction  • Political economy paradigm: emphasized investment shifts by banks, insurance companies, international  corporations that shaped cities by transferring the ownership and uses of land from one social class to  another o Focused on how conflicts between different elements of the urban population determined physical  and social character of the metropolis Factors Contributing to the Emergence of Urban Political Economy  • From order to crisis o Urban sociology first achieved scholarly prominence and coherence as an area of inquiry in the 20s  and 30s in the context of massive migration and immigration to American cities, most notably,  Chicago.  o Mass migration from small towns, villages, rural settings  o Traditional bases of social integration and solidarity (family, neighbourhood, church)  simultaneously breaking down • Policy changes o After WWII, suburban communities proliferated in Canada and US at a fast rate o  One explanation   ▯dominant factor was spike in demand for housing following the cessation of  wartime hostilities  o Because they didn’t build a lot of houses, there was a housing shortage, and that led veterans to live  in crowded quarters in central city with extended family. Also, there was the baby boom where  couples who were separated decided to have babies.  o So to combat this, the small local builders who had previously predominated, gave way to large  corporate developers who mass produced new housing tracts on the edge of the city o Governments encourages suburban housing boom b making a variety of loans and tax incentives  available to developers and low interest mortgages requiring small or no down payments to  purchasers  • Race, class and lifestyle issues o  Second explanation  ▯Those who purchased new homes in the suburbs were actively seeking a  distinct lifestyle characterized by a child centered orientation, the pursuit of status congruent with  the culture of large companies, and intense social involvement with one’s neighbours o In the US, moving to the suburbs was a means of ‘escaping’ the waves of southern blacks and  Hispanics who were flooding into the cities. But CANADA, this escape from the city thesis was  much less of a factor  o Large numbers of white, middle classed Americans to suburbs led to increasing racial polarization • Urban Renewal o Rationale for urban renewal was that the older areas of Canadian cities had become ‘rundown’  ▯ aggressive public investment needed because private real estate market had been sluggish. This was  facilitated by the decision of the federal government to introduce amendments to the National  Housing Act that encouraged ‘slum clearance’ by providing for joint fed­prov participation in public  housing projects and by funding urban renewal studies jointly with municipalities o The initial intention here was altruistic – tear down slums and replace them with decent low­income  housing. But municipalities reaped higher taxes from commercial and industrial buildings than from  new residential areas and renewal funds were increasingly deployed to ‘clear’ inner cities for large­ scale projects such as office complexes and shopping centres SOC205: Week 9  o Since the official definition of ‘blight’ or ‘run down’ was vague, they could legally designate any  residential block with older housing as ‘blighted’. As a consequence, lower income groups from  inner city neighbourhoods were forced to find comparable housing in less accessible areas  o These trends of suburban growth, racial polarization, urban renewal were NOT easily explained by  traditional approaches  ▯the existing paradigm assumed urban economy that operated efficiently  without requiring any significant interference from outside forces o Ex. Africaville:   Primarily black community on periphery of Halifax was totally destroyed.  ▯This area was  ideal location for industrial purposes. Having been defined as a slum, the area was neglected  by city authorities  • Third World Urbanization o Most are characterized by over­urbanization whereby the rate of urban population growth far  outstrips the pace of industrialization. This has resulted in widespread unemployment where rural  migrants flock to cities for jobs/money  ▯Many end up in the informal economy, bartering goods an  services, living in the slums, etc.  o World System theory distinguished between different categories of nations: Core nations such as the  US, Britain, and France performed the functions of capital investment, economic management, etc.  while peripheral nations exported agricultural products and raw materials such as minerals, as well  as supplying cheap factory labour o Foreign investment from core countries centrally influenced urbanization in the Third World by  relegating it to a lesser role in the global division of labour and by accelerating urban growth  Three Key Theories:  1. Maneul Castells: The Crisis of Consumption  • Turning point from human ecological to a political economy paradigm was because of Castells  ▯saw the  application of neo­Marxist to urban issues • Castells argued that the urban problems facing Western societies in the 60s and 70s were different from  those that existed in Chicago in 20s • The exploitation and alienation of the factory had now spilled over and been reproduced beyond the work  place – it characterized the sphere of collective consumption (various services collectively provided by the  state like mass housing, transport, health facilities) • Cities were increasingly losing their central place as the locus of production units and becoming instead  the site of consumption activities (housing, health care, social services, education, transportation)  • This situation contrasts with that of the past when company housing was often provided at minimal cost to  workers • By providing essential services, the state places itself in a contradictory situation in which the interests of  the corporate sector and those of working class consumers directly clash  • Castells concluded that the social mobilizations that occurred in American cities tend to revolve around one  key goal: they have a single objective that is unrelated to broader issues  ▯poor people will mobilize to  obtain greater welfare benefits without challenging the general employment policy or the taxation system  • Three main structural issues underlying these urban mobilizations are: o The preservation and improvement of residential neighbourhoods o Poverty o Social and cultural discrimination • Network society is organized around the opposition between the global and the local.  2. David Harvey: The Crisis of Accumulation  • Harvey viewed urban crisis as a crisis of accumulation  • In America, the ‘crisis’ was triggered by the decision of investors to abandon the inner city  ▯causing  problems like eroding income, rising crime rates physical deterioration of housing SOC205: Week 9  • Crisis of accumulation  ▯real estate investors characteristically tend to over­invest in a particular area  because it appears to be profitable. Soon the market is flooded and a decline in profit or productive  investment occurs • When this happens, investors collectively shift th
More Less

Related notes for SOC205H1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit