Textbook Notes (226,983)
CA (156,684)
UTSG (10,950)
SOC (1,595)
SOC246H1 (20)
Chapter 5

Chapter 5

by OneClass3724 , Winter 2011
12 Pages
137 Views

Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC246H1
Professor
William Magee
Chapter
5

This preview shows pages 1-3. Sign up to view the full 12 pages of the document.
Week 7: February 28
HISTORICAL & CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES
Chapter 5 Historical Perspectives on Aging
INTRODUCTION
There was a golden age of aging
oThe extended family household, which was the site of production and
education, was dominated by older family members
oThe skills were passed from the older to the younger generation
oBecause few people were literate, community traditions were orally
transmitted by the elderly
oThe position of the aged in society: veneration
Then a revolutionary process: modernization
oModernization Theory
As urbanization drew younger people to the cities, the extended
family household was destroyed
As industrialization moved from the household to the factory,
parents lost the ability to teach their skills to their children
As mass education increased rates of literacy, the aged were no
longer the repositories of wisdom
The veneration of the aged was replaced by a cult of youth
Isolated from their families and pushed out of the labor force, the
aged were forced to spend their final days in institutions
WERE THE AGED VENERATED IN PREINDUSTRIAL SOCIETY?
Veneration in Non-Western Cultures
www.notesolution.com
In non-Western cultures the elderly are often accorded great respect and
esteem
oE.g. Traditional Chinese culturea high value on old age
The veneration of the old is linked to Confucian values:
The parent should treat the child with nurturance, and the
child should treat the parent with absolute obedience
Conventional gestures such as speaking politely deferring
in conversation to those older than oneself, and never
ridiculing or insulting the aged
Modernization theorists ask whether practices common in traditional non-
Western cultures were ever found in Western societies in the preindustrial
past and, if so, whether modernization and industrialization destroyed the
tradition of veneration for the elderly
oWestern history indicates that people have always negative views of
the aged
E.g. In his ‘Rhetoric, Aristotle accused the aged of being selfish
and fearful
Most historians believe that the elderly were venerated in the colonial period of
American history
Veneration of the Aged in Colonial Times, 1620-1770
Puritans
oWanted to abolish the church hierarchy and “purify” it from corrupt
influences
oThey wanted a church free from political interference
www.notesolution.com
Puritan ideals and religious beliefs
oThe ordinance of predestination: ones fate was determined before birth
and Christians could do nothing to alter their destiny
oMembers of the elect were saved, regardless of their actions
oThose who were damned could not change their fate no matter how
many good deeds they performed
Doing good works could not earn an individual a place in heaven
Thus, only holding high status in the community was seen as an
indication of salvation
oDifferences in status were inevitable part of colonial society
In this hierarchical society, the elderly occupied a position at the pinnacle
oElders were guides and leaders in all matters
oLife as proceeding through developmental stages with spiritual
development peaking in old age (religious belief)
Thus, the aged were uniquely qualified to serve as moral
exemplars for the young
Many cultural practices symbolized the ideal of veneration
oE.g. in the churches of colonial New England, the places of honor in
the center pews in front of the minister were reserved for the elderly
Colonial society was a gerontocracy = a community ruled by the aged
oHowever, not all elderly people held power and prestige
oVeneration was reserved for older men but rarely granted to women,
immigrants, or slaves
The status of aged women
oSubordination of women to their husbands
A married woman could not make contracts, buy or sell property,
or draft a will
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Week 7: February 28 HISTORICAL & CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES Chapter 5 Historical Perspectives on Aging INTRODUCTION There was a golden age of aging o The extended family household, which was the site of production and education, was dominated by older family members o The skills were passed from the older to the younger generation o Because few people were literate, community traditions were orally transmitted by the elderly o The position of the aged in society: veneration Then a revolutionary process: modernization o Modernization Theory As urbanization drew younger people to the cities, the extended family household was destroyed As industrialization moved from the household to the factory, parents lost the ability to teach their skills to their children As mass education increased rates of literacy, the aged were no longer the repositories of wisdom The veneration of the aged was replaced by a cult of youth Isolated from their families and pushed out of the labor force, the aged were forced to spend their final days in institutions WERE THE AGED VENERATED IN PREINDUSTRIAL SOCIETY? Veneration in Non-Western Cultures www.notesolution.com In non-Western cultures the elderly are often accorded great respect and esteem o E.g. Traditional Chinese culturea high value on old age The veneration of the old is linked to Confucian values: The parent should treat the child with nurturance, and the child should treat the parent with absolute obedience Conventional gestures such as speaking politely deferring in conversation to those older than oneself, and never ridiculing or insulting the aged Modernization theorists ask whether practices common in traditional non- Western cultures were ever found in Western societies in the preindustrial past and, if so, whether modernization and industrialization destroyed the tradition of veneration for the elderly o Western history indicates that people have always negative views of the aged E.g. In his Rhetoric, Aristotle accused the aged of being selfish and fearful Most historians believe that the elderly were venerated in the colonial period of American history Veneration of the Aged in Colonial Times, 1620-1770 Puritans o Wanted to abolish the church hierarchy and purify it from corrupt influences o They wanted a church free from political interference www.notesolution.com
More Less
Unlock Document

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit