Textbook Notes (280,000)
CA (160,000)
UTSG (10,000)
SPA (30)
Chapter 1-20

SPA100Y1 Chapter Notes - Chapter 1-20: El Sistema, La Segunda, Cuesta


Department
Spanish
Course Code
SPA100Y1
Professor
Anne- Emanuelle Birn
Chapter
1-20

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 44 pages of the document.
Spanish Grammar and Structure Lección 1-4 (*Term Test #1)
The Alphabet (El alfabeto)
Letter Name Letter Name Letter Name
A a K ka S ese
B be L ele T te
C ce M eme U u
D de N ene V ve
E e ñ eñe W doble ve
F efe O o X equis
G ge P pe Y i griega
H hache Q cu Z zeta
I i R ere
J jota RR erre
Cardinal Numbers 0-39 (Los números cardinales del 0 al 39)
0 cero 6 seis 12 doce 18 dieciocho
1 uno 7 siete 13 trece 19 diecinueve
2 dos 8 ocho 14 catorce 20 veinte
3 tres 9 nueve 15 quince 21 veintiuno (and so on)
4 cuatro 10 diez 16 dieciséis 30 treinta
5 cinco 11 once 17 diecisiete 31 treinta y uno (and so on)
uno un before a masculine singular noun: un profesor (one professor)
uno una before a feminine singular noun: una profesora (one professor)
Cardinal Numbers 31-100 (Números cardinales 31-100)
31 treinta 53 cincuenta y tres (and so on) 80 ochenta
32 treinta y dos (and so on) 60 sesenta 84 ochenta y cuatro (and so on)
40 cuarenta 68 sesenta y ocho (and so on) 90 noventa
41 cuarenta y uno (and so on) 70 setenta 95 noventa y cinco (and so on)
50 cincuenta 77 setenta y siete (and so on) 100 cien (ciento)
Note that y appears only in numbers between 31 and 99.
Cardinal Numbers 101-1000 (Los números cardinals 101-1000)
101 ciento uno (and so on) 600 seiscientos
200 doscientos 700 setecientos
300 trescientos 800 ochocientos
400 cuatrocientos 900 novecientos
500 quinientos 1000 mil
1. When counting beyond 100 (101 to 199), ciento is used.
2. Y appears only in numbers between 16 and 99. It is not used to separate thousands, hundreds,
and tens from each other: mil quinientos ochenta y seis (1586).
3. In Spanish, one does not count in hundreds beyond 1000; thus, 1100 is expressed as mil cien.
After 1000, thousands are counted dos mil, tres mil, and so on. Note that Spanish uses a period
rather than a comma to indicate thousands.
--¿Cuál es su fecha de nacimiento? What is the date of your birthday?
--El tres de abril de mil novecientos ochenta y dos. April third, nineteen (hundred and)
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

eighty-two.
4. When modifying a feminine noun, the feminine form is used: doscientas sillas.
5. To ask how much a single item costs, say, “¿Cuánto cuesta?” For multiple items, use “¿Cuánto
cuestan?”
--¿Cuánto cuesta el escritorio? How much does the desk cost?
--Cuesta ciento cincuenta dólares. It costs a hundred and fifty dollars.
--¿Cuánto cuestan las ventanas? How much do the windows cost?
--Cuestan mil cien dólares. They cost eleven hundred dollars.
Arithmetic (Aritmética)
+: más
-: menos
=: son
Colors (Los colores)
Red rojo Yellow amarillo Orange anaranjado Pink rosado
Purple morado Blue azul Green verde Grey gris
White blanco Black negro Brown marrón
Days of the Week (Los días de la semana)
Monday
lunes
Tuesday
martes
Wednesday
miércoles
Thursday
jueves
Friday
viernes
Saturday
sábado
Sunday
domingo
--¿Qué día es hoy? ¿Sábado? What day is today? Saturday?
--No, hoy es viernes. No, today is Friday.
1. In Spanish-speaking countries, the week starts on Monday (although in some calendars it is
common to see Sunday as the first day).
2. The days of the week are not capitalized in Spanish.
3. The days of the week are masculine in Spanish. The masculine definite articles el and los are
often used with them to express on.
4. All the days of the week use the same form for the singular and plural (el lunes – los lunes). The
only exceptions are sábado and domingo (el sábado – los sábados; el domingo – los domingos).
Months and Seasons of the Year (Los meses y las estaciones del año)
A. Los meses
January
enero
February
febrero
March
marzo
April
abril
May
mayo
June
junio
July
julio
August
agosto
September
septiembre
October
octubre
November
noviembre
December
diciembre
1. To ask for the date say:
--¿Qué fecha es hoy? What’s the date today?
2. When giving the date, always begin with the phrase “Hoy es el…”
--Hoy es el cuatro de Julio. Today is the fourth of July.
3. Begin with the number, followed by the preposition de (of), and then the month.
el seis de agosto August sixth
--¿Qué fecha es hoy? ¿El treinta de abril? What’s the date today? April thirtieth?
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

--No, hoy es el primero de mayo. No, today is May first.
4. The article el is omitted when the day of the week is expressed.
Hoy es jueves, 20 de abril. Today is Thursday, April 20.
B. Las estaciones del año
Spring
La primavera
Summer
El verano
Fall/Autumn
El otoño
Winter
El invierno
Subject Pronouns (Pronombres personales usados como sujetos)
Singular Plural
yo I nosotros
nosotras
we (masc.)
we (fem.)
you (familiar) vosotros
vosotras
you (mascu., familiar)
you (fem., familiar)
usted you (formal) ustedes you (formal)
él he ellos they (masc.)
ella she ellas they (fem.)
1. The form is used as the equivalent of you to address a friend, a coworker, a relative, or a
child. The usted form is used in general to express deference or respect. In most Spanish-
speaking countries today, young people tend to call each other even if they have just met. If
in doubt, use usted.
2. The plural form of is vosotros(as), which is used only in Spain. In Latin America, the plural
form ustedes (abbreviated Uds.) is used as the plural form of both usted (abbreviated Ud.) and
tú.
3. The masculine plural forms can refer to the masculine gender alone or to both genders together.
Present Indicative of ser (Presente de indicative del verbo ser)
ser to be
Singular
yo soy I am
eres you are (fam.)
usted (Ud.)
es
you are (form.)
él he is
ella she is
Plural
nosotros(as) somos we are
vosotros(as) sois you are (fam.)
ustedes (Uds.)
son
you are (form.)
ellos they are (masc.)
ellas they are (fem.)
1. The verb ser, to be, is irregular. Its forms, like the forms of other irregular verbs, must be
memorized.
2. The verb ser is commonly used to express identity, place of origin, occupation, characteristic,
and nationality.
3. The indefinite article (un, una) is not used after the verb ser when describing profession,
nationality, religion, or party affiliation, unless an adjective follows the noun.
La doctora Mena es profesora.
BUT: La doctora Mena es una profesora excelente.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version