XEROX Unit 6 Joanne Tod's Eloquent Enigmas (p100-113).docx

1 Page
95 Views
Unlock Document

Department
St. Michael's College Courses
Course
SMC219Y1
Professor
Steve Hoselton
Semester
Fall

Description
Joanne Tod’s Eloquent Enigmas – Francesco Guardiani  Contemporary art is btw two diff cultures: modern and postermodern; typography and electronics  We need the artists to chart the present landscape – healing form the rear-view mirror syndrome, we understand the future by looking at the present or we begin to realize that the future is a thing of the past.  Joanne Tod enhances our vision on both the unbroken vigor of the law of two.  In the Kitchen (1975): her iconic reservoir is the whole mass-cultural bundle. She took photograph from a Japanese bondage magazine and put it together with a kitchen. This is called a “psychodrama” – erupting multiple voices and differences. There is domestic comfort vs. violence, everyday life vs. acrobatic sex, and East vs. West  READ pg 102-103  Decoration Knows No Bounds (1984): two figures at the bottom remind ppl of Piero della Francesca’s flipped angels decorating his Madonna del Parto. The eloquency of this picture is in the intensity of the gap – the triangular structure accentruated by the centre to the bottom – whichever angle we take, there is the mysterious serenity (tranquility) of the smile.  Joanne Tod’s psychodrama – Displaced Identity o Wyndham Lewis offers insight into the law of two: You must be a duet in everything. For the individual, the single object, and isolated, is, you must admit, an absurdity. Why try and give the impression of a consistent and indivisible personality.  Self Portrait (1982): Joanne doesn’t look anything like the woman in the painting. Painting is about the process of iconic perception. The gap btw 2 persons – subject and object – is provided by the informal writing on the painting. Despite her portrayal of the theatrical posed, elegantly dressed woman with patrician smile and strong artificial lighting with background representing Washington D.C., there is a gap – the informal writing at the bottom, which represents Japanese car (Russell), and so it is High Society vs. subcompact Japanese. Even the light shawn on the face, making her look pale can reflect the Japanese.  Self Portrait as Prostitute (1983): all the elements of th
More Less

Related notes for SMC219Y1

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit