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Chapter 8

WDW152H1 Chapter 8: Technology and Global Transformation: The Industrial Revolution
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Department
Woodsworth College Courses
Course Code
WDW152H1
Professor
Beth Fischer

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Preventing collision, creating schedules
November 18, 1883 - standard time zones for U.S. and Canada
Many cities resisted - kept their local time
March 19, 1918 - standard time act in U.S.
U.S. not first - Great Western Railway in 1870
August 1880 - Statues Act --> standard time in Britain
William Heuisler, “How did Trains Standardize Time?”
http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-did-trains-standardize-time-in-the-united-
states-william-heuisler
Production of manufactured goods increased
Time regulated lives
England around 1760
9/10 people lived in rural areas
Almost no middle class
People knew little about the rest of the world - little transportation
Textile : first major industry to undergo industrialization
Poor cottage workers used to produce textiles
Spinning jenny and water farmer --> thread produced faster
Spinning mule : 1 person replaced 3,000
Mechanized power looms weaved thread
Cottage weaving industry ended
Luddites - rioting and destruction of machines
Development of factories - people had to leave home to earn a living
and housing built near factories --> cities
First time large numbers of people regulated by clocks
Industrial revolution comes to America --> spies take information from
Britain
Founds mill in 1790
Slater memorizes how machines work
1814 : copies of English power looms
Becomes textile manufacturing nation
Cotton hadn't been used in textiles --> too hard to clean
Increase in slaves working on plantations
Backbone of economy
Cotton gin : cheap to produce --> slaves used
Tools had been made one at a time by blacksmiths
Whitney: 10,000 riles requested
Method to manufacture identical parts - faster to make and fix
Interchangeable parts
Rivers: water power
Uneven / rocky terrain unsuitable for farming
Seaports for imports / exports
Rich men wanting to invest in factories
Industrial revolution in Northern U.S.
Many young children employed in England
'Mill girls' less than $3 for 6 hours of work
In U.S. : young women unmarried, low-wage
United Learning, “Industrial Revolution,” (19:56). Available at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4joqYycnqM
Reading 2.8: Technology and Global
Transformation: The Industrial Revolution
March 8, 2017
7:09 PM
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Reading 2.8: Technology and Global Transformation: The Industrial Revolution March 8, 20177:09 PM William Heuisler, How did Trains Standardize Time? http:ed.ted.comlessonshowdidtrainsstandardizetimeintheunited stateswilliamheuisler Preventing collision, creating schedules November 18, 1883 standard time zones for U.S. and Canada Many cities resisted kept their local time March 19, 1918 standard time act in U.S. U.S. not first Great Western Railway in 1870 August 1880 Statues Act > standard time in Britain United Learning, Industrial Revolution, (19:56). Available at https:www.youtube.comwatch?v=d4joqYycnqM Production of manufactured goods increased Time regulated lives England around 1760 910 people lived in rural areas Almost no middle class People knew little about the rest of the world little transportation Textile : first major industry to undergo industrialization Poor cottage workers used to produce textiles Spinning jenny and water farmer > thread produced faster Spinning mule : 1 person replaced 3,000 Mechanized power looms weaved thread Cottage weaving industry ended Luddites rioting and destruction of machines Development of factories people had to leave home to earn a living and housing built near factories > cities First time large numbers of people regulated by clocks Industrial revolution comes to America > spies take information from Britain Slater memorizes how machines work Founds mill in 1790 1814 : copies of English power looms Becomes textile manufacturing nation Cotton gin : cheap to produce > slaves used Cotton hadnt been used in textiles > too hard to clean Increase in slaves working on plantations Backbone of economy Interchangeable parts Tools had been made one at a time by blacksmiths Whitney: 10,000 riles requested Method to manufacture identical parts faster to make and fix Industrial revolution in Northern U.S. Rivers: water power Uneven rocky terrain unsuitable for farming Seaports for imports exports Rich men wanting to invest in factories Many young children employed in England In U.S. : young women unmarried, lowwage Mill girls less than 3 for 6 hours of work
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