Textbook Notes (378,609)
CA (167,197)
U Windsor (775)
Business (231)
73-100 (5)
Chapter 1-2

73-100 Chapter 1-2: Intro to Data Analysis - Textbook + Lecture notes - ch. 1-2
Premium

3 Pages
93 Views

Department
Business
Course Code
73-100
Professor
Peter Miller

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
CHAPTER 1 Why Statistics is Important to you
Statistics – a way of reasoning, along with a collection of tools and methods, designed to help us
understand the world
- a way of making sense of our world though the collection, analysis and understanding
of data
Statistics - quantities calculated from a subset (aka sample) of a complete data set (aka a
population)
Parameter – a quantity calculated from a population
Data – values along with their context
Plan, do report – carefully plan what you intend to do before you carry out your plan; follow
your plan’ carefully explain your findings
Information = useful data
CHAPTER 2 Data
Data (pl.)– the “things given” for us to turn into information
- systematically recorded information, whether number of labels together with its
context
Context – Who, what, when, where, why, how – it is key to understanding the data
- Who and whatessential for collecting data used for producing useful information
- rows of data correspond to individual cases about whom (or what) we record some
characteristics
- Who:
- Respondents – individuals who answer surveys
- Subjects – people whom we experiment on (= participants, when we acknowledge
the importance of their role)
- Experimental units – animals, plants, websites etc. that we experiment on
- Participant (=subject)– a human experimental unit
- Case – an individual about whom we have data
- Whatvariables of interest (characteristics) measured form the who, with their specific
values being the data
- records –information about an individual (row) in a database
- Observations – how data values are sometimes referred to (careful that you are clear
about the who)
! participants know that they are being observed (can act differently)
! participants don’t know that they are being observed (more accurate)
- Surveys – internet (best chance of getting answered, more honest), personal
interview, mail
- Variables – the characteristics recorded about each individual or case, usually the
columns, should have a name identifying the what
- Value - piece of information on a variable for a single case, data are the values of
variables
! ex. height of students =variable, actual measurements of heights = values

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
CHAPTER 1 Why Statistics is Important to you Statistics a way of reasoning, along with a collection of tools and methods, designed to help us understand the world a way of making sense of our world though the collection, analysis and understanding of data Statistics quantities calculated from a subset (aka sample) of a complete data set (aka a population) Parameter a quantity calculated from a population Data values along with their context Plan, do report carefully plan what you intend to do before you carry out your plan; follow your plan carefully explain your findings Information = useful data CHAPTER 2 Data Data (pl.) the things given for us to turn into information systematically recorded information, whether number of labels together with its context Context Who, what, when, where, why, how it is key to understanding the data Who and what essential for collecting data used for producing useful information rows of data correspond to individual cases about whom (or what) we record some characteristics Who: Respondents individuals who answer surveys Subjects people whom we experiment on (= participants, when we acknowledge the importance of their role) Experimental units animals, plants, websites etc. that we experiment on Participant (=subject) a human experimental unit Case an individual about whom we have data What variables of interest (characteristics) measured form the who, with their specific values being the data records information about an individual (row) in a database Observations how data values are sometimes referred to (careful that you are clear about the who) participants know that they are being observed (can act differently) participants dont know that they are being observed (more accurate) Surveys internet (best chance of getting answered, more honest), personal interview, mail Variables the characteristics recorded about each individual or case, usually the columns, should have a name identifying the what Value piece of information on a variable for a single case, data are the values of variables ex. height of students =variable, actual measurements of heights = values
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit