Desire - Teachings of Lacan, Braunstein.docx

2 Pages
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Department
Comparative Literature and Culture
Course Code
Comparative Literature and Culture 2125A/B
Professor
Andrea Allen

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DESIRE AND JOUISSANCE IN THE TEACHINGS OF LACAN – BRAUNSTEIN  What I call jouissance is always in the name of tension  Jouissance is the dimension discovered by the analytic experience that confronts desire as its opposite pole. If desire is fundamentally lack, it is a something lived by a body when pleasure stops being pleasure  It is evident that the satisfaction proper to jouissance is neither the satisfaction of a need nor the satisfaction of a demand  The drive, the Freudian drive such as it is understood, a constant force, an unending requirement imposed on the psyche due to its link with the body  The drive is a factor that, on finding closed the regressive path to the encounter with the lost object – the object of desire – is left with no alternative but to press forward  Jouissance is the dimension that opens beyond satisfaction precisely because the path of desire, which would lead back in search of the lost and impossible object  The drive traces the object’s contour and on the arch of the way back it accomplishes its task  When you entrust someone with a mission, the aim is not what he brings back, but the itinerary he must take  Jouissance is indeed the satisfaction of a drive – the death drive  Lacan held that desire comes from the Other, while jouissance is on the side of the Thing  The sublimination that provides the Trieb –drive- with a satisfaction different from its aim – an aim that is still defined as its natural aim – s precisely that which reveals the true nature of the Trieb insofar as it is not simply instinct, but has a relationship to das Ding as such, to the Thing insofar as it is distinct from the object  Symptoms only exist insofar as they are actualized under transference  Lacan insists on the necessary presence of the other and the Other for the drive to manifest itself  The jouissance involved in the utilization and the destruction of goods can be understood insofar as those goods are sundered from the use and exchange value they hold in society, and the prestige associated with their destruction passes through the value they hold for
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