Textbook Notes (359,003)
Canada (155,988)
Economics (697)
Chapter 5

Economics 1021A Chapter 5

4 Pages
89 Views
Unlock Document

School
Western University
Department
Economics
Course
Economics 1021A/B
Professor
Terry Biggs
Semester
Fall

Description
Economics 1021A Chapter 4 2013­10­02 The price elasticity of demand is a units­free measure of the responsiveness of the quantity  demanded of a good to a change in its price when all other influences on buying plans remain the same. Calculated by the formula: (% change in quantity demanded) / (% change in price) The change in price is a percentage of the average price — the average of the initial and new price If pizza prices fall from $20.50 to $19.50 (change of 1) the formula reads: (1/20) x 100% = 5% The change in quantity demanded is a percentage of the average quantity demanded — the  average of the initial and new quantity. If pizza sales increase from 9 to 11 (change of 2) the formula reads: (2/10) x 100% = 20% 20%/5% = 4 – the price elasticity of demand By using the average price  andaverage quantity , we get the same elasticity value regardless of  whether the price rises or falls. But it is tmagnitude , or absolute value, that reveals how responsive the quantity change has been to a  price change. Demand can be inelastic, unit elastic, or elastic, and can range from zero to infinity. If the quantity demanded doesn’t change when the price changes, the price elasticity of demand is zero  and the good has a perfectly inelastic demand. The demand curve is vertical If the percentage change in the quantity demanded equals the percentage change in price, the price  elasticity of demand equals 1 and the good has unit elastic demand. If the percentage change in the quantity demanded issmaller  than the percentage change in price, the  price elasticity of demand less  than 1 and the good has inelastic demand. If the percentage change in the quantity demanded isgreater  than the percentage change in price, the  price elasticity of demand greater  than 1 and the good has elastic demand. If the percentage change in the quantity demanded is infinitely large when the price barely changes, the  price elasticity of demand is infinite and the good has a perfectly elastic demand. Elasticity of demand changes along a linear demand curve. At the mid­point of the demand curve, demand is unit elastic. At prices above the mid­point of the demand curve, demand is elastic. At prices below the mid­point of the demand curve, demand is inelastic. The total revenue from the sale of good or service equals the price of the good multiplied by the  quantity sold. When the price changes, total revenue also changes. But a rise in price doesn’t always    increase total revenue. The change in total revenue due to a change in price depends on the elasticity of  demand: If demand is elastic , a 1 percent price cut increases the quantity sold by more than 1 percent, and total  revenue increases. If demand is inelastic , a 1 percent price cut increases the quantity sold by less than 1 percent, and total  revenues decreases. If demand is unit elastic , a 1 percent price cut increases the quantity sold by 1 percent, and total revenue  remains unchanged. The total revenue test is a method of estimating the price elasticity of demand by observing the  change in total revenue that results from a price change (when all other influences on the quantity sold  remain the same): If a price cut increases total revenue, demand is elastic. If a pri
More Less

Related notes for Economics 1021A/B

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit