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Chapter

Nancy Shoemaker: A Strange Likeness – Becoming Red and White in Eighteenth Century North America

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Department
History
Course
History 2301E
Professor
Aldona Sendzikas
Semester
Fall

Description
Nancy Shoemaker A Strange LikenessBecoming Red and White in Eighteenth Century North America Chapter 1 Land y By the end of the eighteenth century EuroAmericans had claimed the land by writing their own history on it y Land as Property o At the time of European contact American Indians did not divide their communal lands into small parcels that could be bought or sold or inherited considered land to be their collective or national property o Many convinced that Indian and European attitudes toward land were completely at odds capitalistic Europeans treated land as a commodity that could be bought or sold while subsistenceoriented Indians thought of property in land only as customary right to use the lands resources o EuropeansFor others to recognize others claims as legitimate for property to existGovernment enforces the will of the community and determines which individual claims to property are legitimate and worth protection o NativesSacred landscapeBelieved there was spirits in everythingIndividuals didnt own property it belonged to the community as a whole tho How 18 century Indians and Europeans allocated use of the public domain may have varied but they conceptualized territorial sovereignty in much the same wayNo doubt Natives saw land as sovereign territory bounded by notable landmarksThe land was never formally divided among nations whatever region was settled by a nation was recognized as property of that nation and no one disputed its title until in course of war one nation overpowered another and drove it out of its territory o Scholars have agreed that Indians throughout North America at the time of European contact and presumably earlier conceptualized land as the property of groups of peopleas sovereign territories o Families hunted in designated areas bounded by natural marks such as rivers and mountainsCalled this land their own bequeathed hunting territories to children could grant others temporary rights and practiced environmental controls such as limiting beaver kills o Planting of fields shows Indian communities did have systems for distributing rights to use land among individual families
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