Textbook Notes (368,295)
Canada (161,777)
Philosophy (290)
Chapter 4

CHAPTER FOUR BE aly.docx

4 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
Philosophy 2074F/G
Professor
Mysty Sybil Clapton
Semester
Winter

Description
CHAPTER FOUR: ETHICS IN THE MARKETPLACE – GENEROSITY,  COMPETITION AND FAIRNESS ­ Businesses are commonly called ‘enterprise associations’ which can be  distinguished from social or community ones where a loose set of objectives  provides the rationale for the association ­ The relationship in enterprise organizations serve the purpose of the organization  rather than personal or social ones ­ Ethics is about human excellence as well as setting minimum standards for any  agent – whether natural or artificial  o Natural persons are people, human beings o Artificial persons are corporations or collectives that can exercise power  of agency ­ Business ethics also refers to minimum standards of organizational conduct ­ In the US, guidelines (Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations) have  been in force to penalize companies before the courts when they have not taken  ethics seriously o They require the introduction of ethics programs into the workplace ­ Personal ethics is a matter of virtue and character  ­ Organizational ethics is a matter of systems of compliance, accountability and  culture Example: ENRON ­ Before Enron’s collapse, they developed a comprehensive ethics policy however  this did not save their corporation from the scandal that occurred ­ CEO of Enron was convicted with six counts of securities and wire fraud ETHICS AND THE LAW ­ Law sets the publicly enforceable minimum standards upon which business can  build ­ Some would say that legal standards are the only ones which should apply and  that ethics is a matter for people not corporations ­ Reliance on law over ethics in setting standards is dangerous to businesses o If conduct is legal then it is ethical o If conduct is not illegal then it is ethical ­ If ethical issues have any real substance to them then they ought to be covered by  aw. ***This suggestion is inaccurate and risky  CORPORATE GIFTS AND BENEVOLENCE ­ The rationale for corporate benevolence is that it builds relationships with clients  or it gives the corporation a public profile  ­ Hospitality offered to staff is justified as rewarding performance  ­ Corporate giving also involves the expenditure of funds  ­ Purchasing Management Association of Canada states within its published code  ethics that members are prohibited from accepting from accepting anything more  than a token gift on ethical grounds  ­ The reason for this is to retain a sense of independence and also there will be no  danger of incremental creep (small gift today, bigger gift tomorrow) ­ May also place an obligation on the receiver to reciprocate the gift A guide to Giving and Receiving corporate gifts: Influence There must be no influence attached to the  gift Reciprocity There must be no expectation of  reciprocating the gift Awareness Respect cultural norms when gift giving Cultural Norms Size and value of a gift must be within the  cultural norms of the society  Appearances The appearance must be so that no  influence exists Policy Must not violate any gift giving policies Conservatism May graciously decline to participate Integrity If any doubt exists with the appearance,  may decline to participate Sensitivity
More Less

Related notes for Philosophy 2074F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit