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World Poverty - Pogge.docx

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Department
Philosophy
Course
Philosophy 2810F/G
Professor
Jennifer Epp
Semester
Fall

Description
WORLD POVERTY AND HUMAN RIGHTS –POGGE  The annual death toll from poverty related causes is 1/3 all human deaths  Our average per capita income nearly 180x greater than that of the poor  Few realize that severe poverty is an ongoing harm we inflict upon the global poor  And are willing to admit that we should do more to help  Actively responsible for this catastrophe ACTUAL HISTORY  Challenges such as this are often dismissed with the lazy response that we cannot be held responsible for what others did long ago  Cannot inherit responsibility, can we plausibly claim the fruits of their sins  The global poor, have a much stronger moral claim to that 1% of the global product they need to meet their basic needs than we affluent have to take 81% for ourselves  A morally deeply tarnished history must not be allowed to result in radical inequality FICTIONAL HISTORIES  Others may believe that it is permissible to uphold any economic distribution no matter how skewed if merely it could have come about on a morally acceptable path – entitled to keep and defend what we possess  For Locke, the justice of any institutional order thus depends on whether the worst off under it are at least as well off as people would be in a state of nature with a proportional resource share  Coercively exclude the global poor from a proportional resource share and any equivalent substitute PRESENT GLOBAL INSITITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS  Reflection on the institutional rules that give rise to it  Bypass such disagreements insofar as these conceptions agree that an economic order is unjust when it – like the systems of serfdom and forced labour prevailing foreseeable and avoidable gives rise to massive and severe human rights deficits  We are preserving our great economic advantages by imposing a global economic order that is unjust in view of the massive and avoidable deprivations it foresee ably reproduces  The radical inequality cannot be traced to extra-social factors THREE NOTIONS OF
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