Rulebook for Arguments 73-86

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Published on 21 Nov 2011
Professor
A Rulebook for Arguments
Pages 73 - 86
3 October 2011
Some Common Fallacies:
- fallacies are misleading types of arguments
au hominem:
- literally, "to the man"
- attacking the person of a source rather than his or her qualifications or
reliability, or the actual arguement he or she makes
ad ignorantian:
- appeal to ignorance
- arging that a claim is true just because it has not been shown to be false
ad misericoridan:
- appeal to pity
ad populum:
- appealing to the emotions of a crowd
- i.e. everyone is doing it
begging the question:
- implicitly using your conclusion as a premise
complex questions:
- posing a question in such a way that people can not agree or disagree with you
without committing themselves to some other claim you wish to promote
equivocation:
- sliding from one meaning of a term to another in the middle of an argument
faluse cause:
- generic term for any questionable conclusion about cause and effect
false delemma:
- reducing the options you consider of just two, often diametrically opposed to
each other and unfair to the people against whom the dilemma is posed
loaded language:
- language that primarily plays on the emotions
non sequitur:
- drawing a conclusion that "does not follow"
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Document Summary

Fallacies are misleading types of arguments au hominem: Attacking the person of a source rather than his or her qualifications or reliability, or the actual arguement he or she makes ad ignorantian: Arging that a claim is true just because it has not been shown to be false ad misericoridan: Appealing to the emotions of a crowd. I. e. everyone is doing it begging the question: Implicitly using your conclusion as a premise complex questions: Posing a question in such a way that people can not agree or disagree with you without committing themselves to some other claim you wish to promote equivocation: Sliding from one meaning of a term to another in the middle of an argument faluse cause: Generic term for any questionable conclusion about cause and effect false delemma: Reducing the options you consider of just two, often diametrically opposed to each other and unfair to the people against whom the dilemma is posed loaded language:

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