Textbook Notes (358,576)
Canada (155,751)
Psychology (4,639)
Chapter 18

CHAPTER 18- Sexual Disorders and Sex Therapy
CHAPTER 18- Sexual Disorders and Sex Therapy

17 Pages
211 Views
Unlock Document

School
Western University
Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 2075
Professor
William Fisher
Semester
Fall

Description
CHAPTER 18­ Sexual Disorders and Sex Therapy Sexual Disorder­ when a problem with sexual response causes significant psychological  distress or interpersonal difficultly (sexual dysfunction also used) Examples: ­ A man’s difficultly getting an erection  ­ A woman’s difficultly having an orgasm  Lifelong sexual disorder­ a sexual disorder that has been present since the person began  sexual functioning  ­ Until 1960 the only available treatment was long term psychoanalysis, which was  costly and not very effective  ­ In 1970 the publication of Human Sexual Inadequacy by Masters and Johnson  reported on sexual disorder’s as well as on rapid­treatment program of  behavioural therapy  ­ Since then there have been other treatments such as cognitive behavioural therapy  and medical (drug) treatments  Sexual Disorders  There are 4 categories of sexual disorders: 1. Desire disorders  2. Arousal disorders  3. Orgasmic disorders  4. Sexual pain disorders  ­ The first 3 categories correspond to components of the sexual response cycle  described by Helen Kaplan (chapter 9) ­ The sexual response cycle has been criticized particularly for women because it  assumes that people proceed in a linear fashion from one phase to the other  ­ Also because the diagnostic categories focus on genital responding and neglect  subjective arousal  Each disorder can be seen to vary along 2 dimensions: 1. Lifelong (primary sexual disorder)­ occurs when the individual has always had  the disorder (e.g., the person has never had an orgasm) 2. Acquired (secondary sexual disorder)­ occurs when the individual currently has  the problem but did not have the problem in the past (e.g., has had orgasms in the  past but is currently unable to orgasm)  Sexual disorders can also be either: ­ Generalized: occurring in all situations  ­ Situational: when the disorder occurs in some situations but not in others  Desire Disorder Includes: ­ Hypoactive sexual desire ­ Sexual aversion disorder  Hypoactive Sexual Desire The term HSD is used when an individual does not have spontaneous thoughts or  fantasies about sexual activity and is not interested in sexual activity  ­ They lack a libido  ­ Also termed as inhibited sexual desire or low sexual desire  Responsive desire is when people feel desire after sexual activity starts (where most  people feel it before)  ­ People with HSD typically avoid situations that will evoke sexual feelings ­ If they do engage in sexual activity it may be because of pressure from their  partner or to meet non­sexual needs such as the need for physical comfort or  intimacy  ­ Too little sexual desire is the most common sexual issue reported in women ­ 30% of Canadian women report diminished sexual desire ­ 10% to 15% of women report no sexual desire with the percent increasing with  age ­ The problem may not be the individual’s level of desire, but a discrepancy  between the partners’ levels Discrepancy of sexual desire­ A sexual problem in which the partners have considerably  different levels of sexual desire  Sexual Aversion Disorder In SAD the person has strong aversion to sexual interaction, involving anxiety, fear, or  disgust, and actively avoids any kind of genital contact with a partner ­ Fairly common in persons who have panic disorder  Arousal Disorder Includes: ­ Female arousal disorder ­ Male erectile disorder  Erectile Disorder ED is the inability to have an erection or maintain one ­ Other terms for it are erectile dysfunction and inhibited sexual excitement  ­ A result of it is that the man cannot have sex  Cases of ED can be: ­ Lifelong erectile disorder (rare) ­ Acquired erectile disorder ­ Situational (generalized) About 10% of men have experienced an erection problem within the last 12 months Varies by age: ­ 7% for 18­29 year olds  ­ 18% for 50­59 year olds ­ Another survey found that 19% of 50­59 year olds ­ 39% in men 60 and over ED is the most common of the disorders among men who seek sex therapy (particularly  since the introduction of Viagra)   Female Sexual Arousal Disorder FSAD refers to the lack of response to sexual stimulation  ­ Involves both a subjective, psychological component and a physiological element  ­ Defined partly by the women’s own subjective sense that she does not feel  aroused and partly by difficulties with vaginal lubrication  Difficulties with lubrication are common ­ Reported by 19% of the women in the NHSLS ­ Become frequent in women during and after menopause and is not a disorder (as  estrogen levels decline, vaginal lubrication decreases) Orgasmic Disorder Includes:  ­ Premature ejaculation ­ Male orgasmic disorder  ­ Female orgasmic disorder  Premature (rapid) Ejaculation PE occurs when a man has an orgasm and ejaculates sooner than desired  ­ In extreme cases ejaculation may take place so soon after erection that it occurs  before penetration can occur ­ In some cases the man can delay ejaculation but not enough to meet their partners  needs  ­ Some experts prefer the terms early ejaculation or rapid ejaculation because they  have fewer negative connotation  Psychiatrist and sex therapist Helen Singer Kaplan believe that the key to defining rapid  ejaculation is: ­ The absence of voluntary control of orgasm Another way to define it is self­definition:  ­ If a man finds that he has become greatly concerned about his lack of ejaculatory  control or that it is interfering with his ability to form intimate relationships, or if  the couple agree that it’s a problem in the relationship, it is legitimate to seek  professional help for these concerns  Research shows that: ­ 24% of Canadian men report having a current problem with climaxing too early  ­ Average time for ejaculation was about 8 minutes  ­ 7% reported ejaculating within 1 minute  ­ 17% reported ejaculating within 2 minutes  ­ Only 10% of women reported that their partners ejaculation was a problem  compared to 24% of men  ­ PE was associated with lower sexual satisfaction for the men but not for their  partners  PE may create a web of related psychological problems  ­ Can cause a man to become anxious about his sexual competence  ­ The partner may become frustrated because she or he is not having a satisfying  sexual experience either (may create friction in a relationship) In class a boy who had PE asked a question and he wondered how the girls in the class  would react to his disorder: ­ The women agreed that their reaction would vary depending on the quality of the  relationship  ­ If they cared deeply they would be sympathetic and patient  ­ His problem with PE not only caused him to not want to have sex anymore, but  also to not date anymore  Home remedies have been developed: ­ Mostly ineffective  ­ Doubling up on condoms  ­ Using desensitizing cream  ­ Thinking of something else  Thinking of something else fell into 5 categories: 1. Sex negatives­ thinking of unattractive TV personalities  2. Sex positive­ thinking “we’re in no hurry” 3. Non­sexual and negative­ thinking of sad events 4. Sex neutral­ counting backwards from 100 5. Sexually incongruous­ thinking of your grandmother  Male Orgasmic Disorder MOD is the opposite of rapid ejaculation ­ The man is unable to orgasm or orgasm is greatly delayed, even though he has a  solid erection and has had more than adequate stimulation  ­ Severity ranges from only occasional problems with orgasming to a history of  never having experienced an orgasm  ­ Most common version, the man is incapable of orgasm during intercourse nut  may be able to orgasm as a result of hand or mouth stimulation  ­ MOD is far less common than PE­ in the NHSLS 8% of male respondents had  had a problem in the past 12 months  Female Orgasmic Disorder FOD is the inability to orgasm ­ Goes by a variety of other terms: orgasmic dysfunction, anorgasmia, and  inhibited female orgasm Can be classified into: ­ Lifelong ­ Acquired  ­ Situational orgasmic disorder Younger women are more likely to report infrequent orgasms  ­ 21% of Canadian women report that they don’t have frequent orgasms (but this  doesn’t mean they have the disorder) Sexual Pain Disorders Includes: ­ Painful intercourse  ­ Dyspareunia  Painful Intercourse PI or dyspareunia refers to genital pain experienced during intercourse  ­ In the NHSLS 14% of women and 3% of men reported pain during intercourse  ­ 14% of Canadian women reported experiencing pain during intercourse In women pain may be felt: ­ In the vagina ­ Around the vaginal entrance and clitoris  ­ Deep in the pelvis  ­ May be generalized or localized to a particular area  ­ Some women describe it as a burning sensation, others a sharp pain or ache  ­ Most of these women experience pain in non­sexual situations affecting the vulva  (sports, inserting tampon…) In men pain is felt: ­ In the penis or testes  Dyspareunia decreases one’s enjoyment of sex and may lead to abstinence  Quebec psychologist Yitzchak Binik: ­ Argue that painful intercourse should be reclassified and treated as a pain disorder  that interferes with sexual activity rather than as a sexual disorder  Vaginismus It is a spastic contraction of the outer third of the vagina ­ Can be so severe that the entrance to the vagina is closed, and penetration is  impossible  ­ Vaginismus and dyspareunia are often associated (if attempted intercourse is  painful, one result may be spasms that close off the vaginal entrance)  ­ Research has found that women with vaginismus had: greater muscle tension,  lower muscle strength, and greater fear and avoidance of intercourse than women  with other forms of dyspareunia  ­ Not all women with vaginismus had muscle spasms  What Causes Sexual Disorders? Biopsychosocial model­ according to it biological, psychological, and social factors all  play a role in the development and maintenance of sexual disorders  Physical Causes Include: ­ Organic factors (such as diseases)  ­ Drugs Erectile Disorder ­ Diseases associated with the heart and the circulatory system are likely to be  associated with an ED, since erection itself depends on the circulatory system  ­ Any kinds of vascular pathology (problems with the blood vessels supplying the  penis) can produce an ED ­ Damage to the penis arteries or the veins may cause an ED ­ ED is associated with diabetes mellitus (why is unknown)  ­ ED may be the earliest symptom of a developing case of diabetes  ­ An estimated 35% of men with diabetes have an ED  ­ Hypogonadism (under functioning of the testes so that testosterone levels are low)  is associated with ED ­ Hyperprolactinemia (excessive production of prolactin) is also associated with ED ­ Any disease or injury that damages the lower part of the spinal cord may cause  ED (since that is the location of the erection reflex centre) ­ Some kinds of prostate surgery may cause the condition  Premature Ejaculation ­ More often caused by psychological than physical factors  ­ May be due to a malfunctioning of the ejaculatory reflexes  ­ These men have a physiological hypersensitivity that results in fast ejaculation ­ Some men may acquire the condition due to a local infection such as prostatitis or  degeneration in the related parts of the nervous system which may occur in neural  disorders such as multiple sclerosis  Sociobiologist’s explanation:  ­ PE has been selected for in the process of evolution: “survival of the fittest”  ­ Monkeys and apes (and humas) who ejaculated rapidly were more likely to  survive and reproduce: the female would be less likely to get away, and the male  less likely to be attacked  ­ Average time from intromission (p in vagi) to ejaculation among chimps is about  7 seconds  Male Orgasmic Disorder MOD or retarded ejaculation, may be associated with: ­ Multiple sclerosis  ­ Spinal cord injury  ­ Prostate surgery ­ Most commonly with psychological factors  Female Orgasmic Disorder May be caused by: ­ Severe illness  ­ General ill health  ­ Extreme fatigue ­ Injury to the spinal cord  ­ Most cases by psychological factors  Painful Intercourse Dyspareunia in women is often caused by organic factors, but can be caused by  psychological factors. Organic Factors Include: 1. Disorders of the vaginal entrance: ­ Irritated remnants of the hymen ­ Painful scars ­ From an episiotomy or sexual assault ­ Infection of the Bartholin glands  2. Disorder of the vagina: ­ Vaginal infections ­ Allergic reactions  ­ Thinning of the vaginal wall  ­ Scarring of the roof of the vagina (can occur after hysterectomy)  3. Pelvic disorder: ­ Infection such as pelvic inflammatory disease  ­ Endometriosis  ­ Tumours  ­ Cysts ­ Tearing of the ligaments supporting the uterus  Organic factors in men: ­ For uncircumcised men, poor hygiene causing infection ­ Allergic reactions ­ Prostate problems Vaginismus  ­ Sometimes caused by painful intercourse, and organic factors that cause that  condition ­ More frequently by psychological factors or interpersonal factors  Drugs Alcohol Effects of alcohol fall into 3 categories: 1. Short­term pharmacological effects 2. Expectancy effects 3. Long­term effect of chronic alcohol abuse Alcoholics frequently have sexual disorders including: ­ Erectile disorder ­  Orgasmic disorder  ­ Loss of desire Chronic alcoholism in men may cause: ­ Disturbances in sex hormone production due to atrophy of the testes or liver  damage  ­ Also has negative side effects on interpersonal relationships People who have had one or many drinks in a night: ­ May have the expectation that alcohol will loosen them up and will produce  increased physiological arousal and subjective feelings of arousal ­ Expectancy effects interact with the pharmacological effects and work mainly at  low does (only when little alcohol is consumed)  ­ At high levels of alcohol it acts as a depressant and sexual arousal is suppressed  Illicit or Recreational Drugs Marijuana: ­ In surveys many users report that it increases sexual desire and makes sex better ­ Negative effects include risky unprotected sex  ­ Chronic users report decreased sexual desire  ­ In community studies, marijuana use has been associated with orgasmic disorder  Cocaine: ­ One of the drugs of choice for enhancing sexual experiences  ­ Said to increase sexual desire, enhance sensuality, and delay orgasm  ­ Chronic use: loss of sexual desire, orgasmic disorder, erectile disorder ­ Most negative effects are on those who inject it Stimulating Drugs (amphetamines): ­ Associated with increased sexual desire and better control of orgasm ­ Injection of them causes physical sensation that can be described as a total body  orgasm ­ In some cases it can become difficult or impossible to orgasm Crystal Meth: ­ While on it people engage in unprotected sex (usually)  ­ One study showed that over 2 months people that used it reported having on  average 22 acts of unprotected sex, and 9 different sex partners  ­ Can lead to paranoia, hallucinations, and violent behaviour  Opiates or Narcotics: ­ Such as morphine, heroin, methadone  ­ Strong suppression effects on sexual desire and response ­ Long­term use of heroin leads to decreased testosterone levels in men Prescription Drugs Psychiatric drugs: ­ Can effect sexual functioning  ­ These drugs have their beneficial psychological effects because they alter the  functioning of the central nervous system ­ The CNS altering effects sexual functioning  ­ Drug used to treat schizophrenia may cause delayed orgasm in men ­ Tranquillizers and antidepressants often improve sexual responding  ­ Many antidepressants cause desire, arousal, and delayed orgasm problems 
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 2075

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit