Textbook Notes (368,326)
Canada (161,799)
Psychology (4,889)
Chapter 9

CHAPTER 9- Sexual Response

13 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 2075
Professor
William Fisher
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 9; Sexual Response 10/30/2012 The Sexual Response Cycle ­ Masters & Johnson: provided one of first models of the physiology of human sexual response (1966) ­ sexual response 3 stages of progression: excitement, orgasm and resolution  ­ 2 basic physiological processes occur during these stages: vasocongestion : an accumulation of blood in the blood vessels of a region of the body, especially the  genitals; a swelling of erection results, dilation of blood vessels  myotonia : muscle contraction, Excitement : the first stage of sexual response, during which erection in the male and vaginal lubrication  in the female occur ­ vasocongestion occurs in this stage  ­ erection: corpora cavernosa and the corpus spongiosum fill with blood ­ as become close to ejaculation in men: few drops of fluid secreted by cowper’s gland come out of the tip  of penis ­ vasodilation of arteries that supply corpora cavernosa and spongiosum, veins carrying blood away from  the penis compressed, constricting outgoing blood flow, arteries dilate because the smooth muscle  surrounding the arteries relaxes  ­ neurotransmitter nitric oxide involved in erection  ­ Viagra acts on NO system  ­ vasoconstriction makes erection go away; neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine are involved  ­ lubrication of vagina result from vasocongestion also; capillaries in the walls of the vagina dilate and blood  flow through increases ­ lubrication results from fluids seeping through the vaginal walls  ­ orgasmic platform : a tightening of the entrance to the vagina caused by contraction of the  bulbospongiosus muscles (which covers the vestibular bulbs), makes vaginal entrance smaller  ­ glans of the clitoris (the tip) swells, due to engorgement of its corpora cavernosa  ­ the crura of the clitoris (lies deeper in the body) also swells as result of vasocongestion ­ vestibular bulbs (lie along the wall of the vagina) are also erectile and swell  ­ late in phase, clitoris may retract/ draw up into body  ­ vasocongestion in women results from same underlying physiological processes as in men  ­ arteries supply: glans, crura of clitoris, vestibular bulbs; NO also involved ­ estrogen aids vasodilation  ­ excitement: inner lops swell and open up; response to vasocongestion  ­ muscle fibres (myotonia) surrounding nipple contract and make nipples erect, breasts swell and enlarge  ­ walls of vagina ‘ballooning’ response to accommodate penetration  ­ in men: skin of the scrotum thickens, scrotal sac tenses, scrotum is pulled up and closer to the body,  spermatic cords shorten pulling testes closer to body  ­ vasocongestion and myotonia {inability to reflex voluntary muscle} continue to build up until there is  sufficient tension for orgasm  Orgasm : the second stage of sexual response; an intense sensation that occurs at the peak of sexual  arousal and is followed by release of sexual tensions  ­ men orgasm: series of rhythmic contractions of the pelvic organs at 0.8 second intervals ­ male orgasm 2 stages: the preliminary stage; the vas, seminal vesicles and prostate contract, forcing  ejaculate into a bulb at the base of the urethra  ­ call this sensation ‘ejaculatory inevitability’ (Masters & Johnson)  second stage: urethral bulb muscles at the base of the penis, and the urethra contract rhythmically, forcing  semen through the urethra and out tip  ­ women also series of rhythmic muscular contractions of the orgasmic platform occurring at about 0.8  second intervals, uterus contracts rhythmically, anus muscles may contract ­ few contractions for mild orgasm rd Resolution : the 3  stage of sexual response, in which the body returns to the un­aroused state ­ detumescence in men or loss of erection  2 stages: emptying of the corpora cavernosa then slower emptying of the corpus spongiosum and glans  ­ men enter  refractory period : the period following orgasm during which the man cannot be sexually  aroused, becomes longer as get older  ­ oxytoxin is secreted during sexual arousal, surge of prolactin occurs at orgasm in both women and men  more on women’s orgasms  clitoral orgasm vaginal orgasm : Freud considered this to be more mature kind of orgasm   ­ distinction of areas of stimulation originated by Freud  ­ after Oedipal stage shift erogenous zone to vagina  ­ Masters & Johnson disagree with Freud’s comparisons of orgasms and think both are equally pleasurable,  believe physiologically there is only one orgasm  ­ clitoris stimulated even in a ‘vaginal orgasm’ ­ Kinsey & Masters & Johnson: women can have multiple orgasms; vasocongestion longer to return to  baseline in women  other models ­ criticism that Masters & Johnson model ignores the cognitive and subjective aspects of sexual response,  focused too much on physiological aspects, omits subjective thoughts/feelings  ­ women’s sense of being aroused often unrelated to awareness of genital changes  ­ Quebec researchers: 2 components of orgasm for both men and women; sensory and cognitive affective  dimension  ­ Masters & Johnson studied people who volunteered and declared had orgasm via masturbation and sex,  excluding others  ­ research was not objective or universal  Alternative Models of Sexual Response Kaplan’s Triphasic Model Tiphasic model  : Kaplan’s model of sexual response, in which there are 3 components: sexual desire,  vasocongestion and muscular contractions  ­ not successive stages, 3 relatively independent components  ­ physiological components controlled by different parts of the nervous system ­ vasocongestion controlled by the parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system  ­ ejaculation & orgasm controlled by sympathetic division  ­ impairment of the vasocongestion response or the orgasm response produce different sexual disorders  ­ Kaplan’s model useful for understanding the nature of sexual response and for understanding and treating  disturbances in it.  ­ desire comes before arousal The Intimacy Model ­ Basson ­ intimacy based model of sexual response  ­ people in long term relationships may not be motivated to engage in sexual activity by their experience of  spontaneous sexual desire, motivated for other reasons  ­ begin sexual activity in a sexually neutral state, but are receptive to sexual stimuli that will arouse them  emotional intimacy ▯ sexual neutrality ▯ (receptive to) sexual stimuli ▯ (psychological/biological influences)  ▯ sexual arousal ▯ sexual desire & arousal ▯ emotional & physical satisfaction ­­­­­ [return to emotional  intimacy to complete circle] dual control model  ­ Bancroft  ­ dual control model : a model that holds that sexual response is controlled both by sexual excitation  and by sexual inhibition  ­ 2 basic processes underlie human sexual response: responding with arousal to sexual stimuli & inhibiting  sexual arousal  ­ inhibition of sexual response is adaptive across species; sexual arousal can be a powerful distraction that  could become disadvantageous or even dangerous in certain situations  ­ propensities toward sexual excitation and sexual inhibition vary widely from one person to the next  ­ high excitement, low inhibition; engage in high risk sexual behaviors ­ opposite develop sexual disorders  ­ levels have biological bases, early learning and culture are critical factors for both men and women as  well; determine which stimuli individual will find sexually exciting or will set off inhibition  Hormonal & Neural Bases of Sexual Behavior The Brain, the spinal cord & sex Spinal Reflexes ­ erection and ejaculation controlled by fairly simple spinal cord reflexes 3 basic components in reflex: the receptors: which are sensory neurons that detect stimuli and transmit the  message to the spinal cord or brain the transmitters: which are centers in the spinal cord or brain that receive the message, interpret it, and  send out a message to produce the appropriate response  effectors: neurons or muscles that respond to the stimulation  mechanism of erection  ­ produced by spinal reflex or cognitive factors  ­ penis has lots of receptor neurons, tactile stimulation produces a neural signal that is transmitted to an  erection center in the sacral or lowest part of the spinal cord, this center sends out a message via the  parasympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system to the muscles (the effectors) around the walls  of the arteries in the penis; muscles relax & arteries expand  mechanism of ejaculation  2 ejaculation centers, located higher in the spinal cord ­ sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the nervous system are involved, response is muscular  ­ message sent to ejaculation center which is located in the lumbar portion of the spinal cord; message then  sent out via the nerves in the sympathetic nervous system, and this message triggers muscle contractions  in the internal organs that are involved in ejaculation  ­ brain influence ejaculati
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 2075

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit