Textbook Notes (368,125)
Canada (161,663)
Psychology (4,889)
Chapter

ChapterNotes.doc

14 Pages
129 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 2075
Professor
William Fisher
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 1: Sexuality In Perspective  ­Why do people study sex?     ­Sex is an important force in many people’s lives   ­Sex research is core psychological science and is used in multiple areas of psychology (clinical, biological,    developmental, personality, social, evolutionary)    ­Sex research is a core social science, used in sociology, anthropology, economics, history   ­Sex research is a core medical science, used in anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, endocrinology and virology    ­People want to know about sex; social comparison motive, individuals are driven to gain accurate self­   evaluations by comparing themselves to other around them    ­People need to know and be educated about sex  ­Sex and gender; there are obviously differences in the way females and males perceive sex and these will be addressed in a  later chapter. “sexual behavior” is defines as behavior that produces arousal and increases the change of orgasm. ­Sexual orientation is something that can be seen as a preference or an innate response to a certain category of people.    ­Should it be based on arousal or behavior or fantasy of an individual?   ­Is it intermittent or lifelong? (hasbians?)   ­What is the causation of sexual orientation? (etiology)   ­Binary or trinary or more?  ­Influences on Sexuality include:    ­Religion is a powerful influence on the sexual attitudes of many individuals; each religion has a different view     on what is right and what is wrong. Some examples are:    ­Ancient Greeks thought humans were originally double beings with double organs and limbs (double    males, double females and one of each), the gods thought they were too powerful and split them in half    and homosexuals are made of those who were originally double males/ females and heterosexuals are    ones that were originally half male and half female   ­Science and sex are also closely related but scientific research of sex was done against the religious    backgrounds of the time. Researchers began their work in the late 1800s in both North American and Europe   ­Scientific study can be used to defy some of the stereotypes of sex in that era   ­eg. Clelia Mosher, physician conducted survey of Victorian women over span of 30 years, shows    that women of Victorian era did in fact feel sexual desire and many carried on affairs    ­Havelock Ellis was a physician in Victorian England, believed that women are also sexual creatures and    that sexual deviations from the norms are usually harmless and urged society to accept them    ­Richard von Krafft­Ebing; specialized in “pathological” sexuality, coined concepts of sadism, masochism    and pedophilia (“psychopathia sexualis)   ­Magnus Hirschfeld; administered first large scale sex survey also established first journal devoted to    the study of sexuality, special interest in homosexuality    ­also a women’s and abortion rights activist   ­Alfred Kinsey and colleagues in 1940’s investigated sexual disorders and physiology of sexual    response, changed how people thought about sex and led to more open public discussion of sexuality    ­Sylvester Graham; dietician whose main goal was to curb lust, believed that certain foods could prevent    excessive sexual activity (which he viewed as a negative thing)    ­John Harvey Kellogg: believed that sexual activity was negative on the basis of STDs, also viciously    discouraged masturbation believing that it was physically and morally destructive    ­gave women carbolic acid to rub on their clitoris to prevent masturbation   ­Sigmund Frued; pioneer of sexual psychology, believed that adult development and behaviors were    sublimations of infantile sexuality    ­Media may play the same role in sexuality as religion did in previous centuries with 35% of programs showing    some sexual behavior across a typical week in 2005, yet only 2% depicted any sort of sexual precaution.    Communications theorists believe that the media can have 3 types of influence:    i) Cultivation: notiong that people begin to think what media/ television portrays actually represents    the mainstream of what happens in our culture   ii) agenda­seeting: news reporters select what to report and what to ignore and, within the stories     reported, what to emphasize. The media therefore tells us what the agenda is in which we should pay    attention to.    iii) Social learning: idea that characters in media serve as models whom we imitate, sometimes without    even realizing it       ­Internet is perhaps the most powerful mass media influence and serves as a place to engage in sexual    activity (porn, erotic photos, virtual sex, etc) ­Cross­Cultural perspectives on sexuality; culture refers to tradition (passed down from generation to generation) ideas and  values transmitted to members of the group by symbols that then serves as the basis for patterns of behavior observed in the  group   ­Ethnocentrism: observing other cultures based on your own culture and values included in it   ­Incest taboos: sexual relations with a family member, universally disapproved of    ­However, regulations, sexual behaviors and attitudes vary greatly across various countries  ­Variations in sexual techniques; across cultures, there is much variance in sexual activities, kissing is usually common among  cultures, in addition the frequency of sexual intercourse (in married couples) varies greatly among cultures from once or twice  a month (Irish natives of Inis Beag) to 5 times a day every day early in marriage (santals of S. Asia). Most cultures have a  postpartum sex taboo (sex after birthing a baby) that ranges from a couple days to a year.   ­Masturbation: self­stimulation of the genitals, some societies tolerate it and some encourage whereas others    condemn the practice at any age, female   ­Premarital and Extramarital sex: varies between different cultures, extramarital sex is usually frowned upon    and when it I permitted, it is subjected to regulations, the most common being husbands but not wives are    allowed to engage in it   ­sex with same sex partners: varies greatly across cultures, ranging from strictly prohibited to encouraged,    some societies have formalized roles for adult gay males. Three general rules seem to emerge:   i) no matter how society views homosexuality, behavior always occurs in some individuals, same sex    sexuality is found universally    ii) males are more likely to engage in same sex activity than females   iii) same sex activity is never the predominant form of sexual behavior for adults in any society   ­Standards of attractiveness: varies in different cultures, place emphasis on different parts of the body   ­eg. in North America, skinny is labeled as attractive, other cultures think plump is more attractive   ­Regional and cultural variation in sexuality; there are not only differences between cultures but also within   a) Social class and sex: those in lower social class seem to have began engaging in sexual behavior at a    younger age even though all sexual classes had the same percentage of population engaging in sexual    activity. Also found that manual workers engaged in both sexual intercourse and oral­genital sex more    frequently than those with office/ professional jobs   b) Regional differences in sexuality: no difference between provinces but Quebecers seemed to be more    liberal in their attitudes and a higher percentage live in common law relationships. No difference in    attitudes towards gay rights. Not otherwise distinct in their likelihood to engage in safer sex    c) comparing Canada and the united states: in general, Canadians are more liberal than Americans,    more accepting of premarital sex, abortion, homosexuality, same sex marriage and extramarital sex.    d) Aboriginal Peoples and Sexuality: most behaviors have been influenced by Judeo­Christina tradition   e) Ethnocultural communities in Canada and Sexuality: sexual behavior influenced by culture of their    country of origin as well as the process of adapting to Canada’s majority culture, generally men and    women are seen to have distinct role, usually men are seen as the head of the family while women are    passive and submissive with little power in sexual relations. Virginity at marriage is highly values in    women but not expected of men.    ­Significance of Cross­cultural studies: important because it shows us that there is enormous variation in    human sexual behavior and also stresses the importance of culture and learning in the shaping of our sexual    behavior; show that human sexual behavior is not completely determined by biology or instincts  ­Cross­species perspectives on sexuality; to put out own sexual behavior into evolutionary perspective, it helps to explore the  similarities and differences between our own sexuality and that of other species    ­Masturbation: found among many species, especially primates, bodies are more flexible so they can perform    mouth­genital sex on themselves   ­eg. red deer; during rutting season move the tips of their antlers through low growing vegetations,    produces erection and ejaculation    ­Same Sex sexual behavior: observations of other species indicate that our basic mammalian heritage is    bisexual, anal intercourse has been observed in some male primates, females also have been seen to mount    other females in a number of primate species   ­Non sexual uses of sexual behavior: commonly behaviors that involve one participant engaging in a sexual    posture signal the end of a fight where the loser indicates his surrender.    ­Sexual behavior can also symbolize an animal’s rank in a dominance hierarchy, dominant animals    mount subordinate ones such as in the male squirrel monkey (phallic aggression)   ­Humans use rape as an expression of aggression against women, male exhibitionists sometimes reveal    themselves to shock and frighten women ­How are humans unique then? Among lower species, sexual behavior is more hormonally controlled (innate) while higher  species use their brain (therefore by learning and social content). However, there is little in human sexuality that is completely  unique to humans except complex cultural influences but in all other respects, we are a continuum with other species.  ­The Sexual health perspective: sexual health is an important new concept as well as social and political movement that is  defined as “a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well­being in relation to sexuality. For sexual health to be attained  and maintained, the sexual rights of all persons must be respected, protected and fulfilled.”    ­includes public health efforts to prevent HIV as well as other STDs   ­programs have been implemented to promote women’s reproductive rights, enhance romantic relationships,    activism to end discrimination/ violence against gays etc   ­Negative rights are freedoms “from” (freedom from sexual violence) while positive rights are freedoms “to”    (freedom to express one’s sexuality)   ­Sexual rights: idea that all human beings have a certain, basic, inalienable rights regarding sexuality that stem    from basic human rights. Means everyone has the right to access reproductive health care, receive sex    education and consent/ not consent to marriage.    ­In many parts of the world, women do not have these rights and may be forced to marry, have no recourse if     they experience assault, etc.    Chapter 2: Theoretical Perspectives on Sexuality ­Theory: empirically testable explanation for sexual (or any other) phenomenon   ­Theories enable us to understand sexual behavior by providing an empirically testable account of the causes of    such behavior    ­Theories also enable us to predict sexual behavior by providing empirically testable account of the causes of    such behavior  (if A (causes), then B (sexual behavior))    ­Theories enable us to control sexual behavior by identifying potentially changeable causes of sexual behavior   ­if causes are changed, sexual behavior will be changed (controlled)    ­A  B, C ­/­> B, C D ­Theory in sexual science:    ­“imports”: psychological theory from outside of sexual science has been “imported” and applied in context of     human sexuality  includes psychoanalytic theory   ­“indigenous”: psychological theory has been developed specifically as explanation for human sexual behavior,    incorporating causes and consequences that are specifically appropriate to this behavioral context    includes sociobiological theories, sexual behavior sequence ­Evolutionary Perspectives: use principles from evolutionary biology, idea that some behaviors are a result of evolution is  called sociobiology    ­Evolution is driven by natural selection, process by which individuals who are best adapted are most likely to    survive   ­How to humans choose mates?   ­one major criterion is physical attractiveness, indicate health and vigor of individual    ­once man and woman mate, are obstacles to reproductive success such as infant vulnerability; facilitated by;   ­pair­bond: between mother and father   ­attachment: between infant and parent   ­greatly increases offspring’s chances of survival    ­parental investment: behavior and resources invested in offspring to achieve healthy offspring   ­stepchildren vs. genetic children? More money invested in current genetic, least in past    stepchildren, equal in current stepchildren and genetic (maybe to strengthen pair­bond)   ­genetic assurance: degree of confidence that offspring belongs to individual   ­Reproductive strategies will differ for men and women because their genetic assurance, commitment to    offspring, and reproductive potential differ vastly   ­these reasons indicate that men should be promiscuous while women highly selective of mates   ­Sexual selection: selection that results from differences in traits affecting access to mates, consists of;   a) competition among members of one gender (usually males) for mating access to other gender   b) preferential choice by members of one gender (usually females) for certain members of other gender   ­Criticisms against sociobiology include:   ­it rests on outmoded version of evolutionary theory that modern biologists consider naïve    ­sociobiology has focused mainly on individuals struggle for survival and efforts to reproduce, modern    biologists focus on more complex issues such as the survival of the group and species    ­sociobiologists assume that the central function of sex is reproduction, is probably not true today    ­also does not explain any aspect of homosexuality   ­human beings adapt very rapidly and at low cost to culture/circumstance via cognition, emotion, learning ­Evolutionary psychology: focuses on how natural selection has shaped psychological mechanisms and processes (the mind)  rather than how it has shaped sexual behavior directly    ­if behaviors evolved in response to selection pressures, it is plausible to argue that cognitive or emotional    structures evolved the same way   ­one line of research has concentrated on sexual strategies, theory is:   ­men and women have faced different adaptive problems in short term, or casual mating and in long    term mating and reproduction, these differences lead to different strategies or behaviors designed to    solve these problems   ­in short term mating; female may choose partner who offers her immediate resources   ­in long term mating; female may choose partner who appears able to provide future resources   ­based on research on college students, males generally relax their standards when seeking a short term    partner, women’s preferences change less than men’s do between long and short term partners    ­men look for large breasts, concealed ovulation (strengthens persistent pair­bonding) ­Psychological Theories: four major theories in psychology are relevant to sexuality:   i) Psychoanalytic theory: Freud saw sex as one of the key forces in human life, termed sex drive libido as one of    the two major forces motivating human behavior    ­Freud described human personality as being divided into 3 major parts; id, ego and superego   ­id: basic part of personality, present at birth, operates “pleasure principle”   ­ego: acts as “reality principle”, keeps id in line, makes people have rational interactions   ­superego: the conscience, contains values and ideals of society, “idealism”, aim is to inhibit the    impulses of id and persuade ego to strive for moral goals rather than realistic ones      ­id present at birth, ego develops early in childhood, superego develops last   ­erogenous zones: Freud saw libido being focused in various regions of the body, erogenous zone is part    of skin or mucous membrane that is extremely sensitive to touch (lips/ mouth, genitals, anus)   ­stages of psychosexual development: Freud believed that the child passes through series of stages of    development, each of these stages has a different erogenous zone as the focus of pleasure    i) oral stage: birth to age 1, stimulating mouth and tongue via sucking on objects   ii) anal stage: age 2, interest is focused on elimination    iii) phallic stage: age 3 to age 5/6, focused on genitals (penis/ clitoris)   ­development of Oedipus complex: boy loves mother, girl loves father   ­males have castration anxiety, scared father will castrate him for desiring his mother     ­females have penis envy, wishes to have penis, eventually identifies with mother in role   iv) latency; age 5/6 to adolescence, sexual impulses are repressed/ are in quiescent state   v) genital stage: puberty, sexual urges become more genital, other urges fuse together to    promote reproduction (anal, oral, genital)   ­mature sexuality = heterosexual, vaginal (shares) not clitoral (masturbatory) orgasms     ­evaluation of psychoanalytic theory: one major problem is that it cannot be evaluated scientifically to    see whether they are accurate, unconscious cannot be monitored    ­Freud’s patients were usually mentally ill, theories based on disturbed human personality   ­Feminists say Freud’s theories are male centered   ii) Learning theory: much of sexual behavior is learned instead of biologically controlled   ­classical conditioning: unconditioned stimulus (appealing food), elicits unconditioned response    (salivation), pair conditioned stimulus (sound of bell) with unconditioned stimulus (food)   ­eventually will salivate at sound of bell (unconditioned response with conditioned stimulus)    ­operant conditioning: person performs particular behavior (operant), behavior is followed by either a    reward (positive reinforcement) or punishment   ­is rewarded, behavior will become more frequent, if punished, less frequent or eliminated   ­sexual behavior can be the reward or the operant behavior   ­delay principle: punishment does not have as much of effect if it happens a while after behavior    ­behavior therapy: involves set of techniques based on principles of classical or operant conditioning    that are used to change/ modify human behavior    ­used mostly for sexual disorders (eg. orgasm behavior)   ­does not involve in­depth analysis of personality, only modifies behavior   ­social learning: based on principles of operant conditioning but also recognizes that people learn by    observing others (observational learning) in person or in media, involves two other processes;   ­imitation and identification, useful in explaining development of gender identity   ­self­efficacy; sense of competence from successful experiences with an activity over time   iii) Social exchange theory: emerged out of social learning theory and uses concept of reinforcement to explain    satisfaction, stability and change in relationships among people   ­also useful in explaining sexuality in close relationships   ­theory assumes we have freedom of choice and every action provides some rewards and entails certain    costs   ­theory states we are hedonistic; try to maximize rewards and minimize costs when we act    ­theory views social relationships as exchanges of goods and services among persons    ­level of expected outcomes is called comparison level, level of outcomes in the best alternative    relationship is called comparison level for alternatives   ­studies show that concept of rewards and costs can explain whether people stay in relationship or not   ­central concept of equity; exits when participants in relationship believe that rewards they receive are    proportional to costs they bear   ­equality exits when both partners experience the same balance of rewards to costs   ­criticized as downplaying other aspects of relationship and not able to explain selflessness (altruism)   iv) Cognitive theory: places emphasis on the way people perceive and think, basic principle that what we think    influences what we feel, and thus how we perceive and evaluate a sexual event makes all the difference   ­cognitive psychology can be used to understand cycle of sexual arousal, causes of sexual variation    (fetishes), and causes and treatment of sexual disorders    ­Sandra Bem proposed schema theory to explain gender­role development ad impact of gender on    people’s daily lives   ­schema: general knowledge framework that a person has about a particular topic   ­organizes and guide perception, helps us remember can misguide memory    ­gender schema: cognitive structure comprised of set of attributes (behaviors, personality,    appearance) that we associate with males and females   ­predisposes us to process information on the basis of gender  ­Sociological perspectives: sociologists are most interested in the ways in which society or culture shapes human sexuality.  Sociologist approach the study of sexuality with three basic assumptions:   i) every society regulates the sexuality of its members   ii) basic institutions of society (eg. religion, family) affect the rules governing sexuality in that society   iii) the appropriateness of inappropriateness of a particular sexual behavior depends on culture in    which it occurs    ­Social institutions: each major institution in society supports a sexual ideology which influence beliefs    ­religion: Christian religion has tradition of asceticism, in which abstinence rom sexual pleasures is seen    as virtuous   ­procreational ideology: sex is only legit between heterosexual marriage with goal of having kids   ­creates norms that say premarital, extramarital and homosexual sex are all wrong    ­other religions (Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, etc) have their own views on sexuality   ­economy: before industrial revolution, more work was done in family unit at home/ farm, this ensured    a strict surveillance of family members’ sexuality   ­after industrial revolution, men spent hours away from home each day, more leeway for things    such as extramarital sex and affairs (including same sex)   ­current economic conditions affect sexuality as well;   eg. very low wages in Russia, cannot afford condoms, high STD rates   ­also lead to a major increase in prostitution especially in poor countries (eg. Thailand)   ­family: created triple linkage between love, marriage and sex (eventually became direct love/sex link)   ­relational ideology: argued that extramarital sex was permissible if relationship was loving    ­socialization of children: parents teach children appropriate norms for behavior including    sexuality    ­medicine: physicians tell us what is healthy and what isn’t, sex therapists tell us that sexual expression    is natural and healthy    ­childbirth is also much safer nowadays   ­therapeutic ideology: great confidence in medical advice, have enormous impact on sexuality   ­medicalization of sexuality: domination of contemporary theory and research by the    biomedical model, has two components   i) certain behaviors or conditions are defined in terms of health and illness   ii) problematic experiences or practices are given medical treatment (eg. ED and meds)   ­the law: laws help determine the norms and are enforced by the government   ­state what is illegal and what isn’t in terms of sexual behavior   ­laws are also the basis for the mechanisms of social control, may specify punishments for    certain acts and discourage people from engaging in them    ­law also reflects interests of the powerful, dominant groups within society confirm the    superiority of the ideologies of these dominant groups   ­many laws condemn non procreative sex (homosexuality, bestiality, etc)   ­another principal source of sex laws is sexism, deeply rooted in Western culture   ­men usually hold power and make laws   ­Symbolic interaction theory: human nature and social order are products of symbolic communication among    people, a person’s behavior is constructed through his or her interactions with other    ­an objects meaning for a person depends not on the properties of the object but on what the person    might do with it, object only takes on meaning in relation to a persons plans     ­definition of the situation: actions fit together and achieve agreement, must continually reaffirm old    meanings or negotiate new ones (eg. woman inviting man back to her apartment)    ­role­taking: individual imagines how he/she looks from other person’s viewpoint     ­able to anticipate what behavior will enable us to achieve our goal   ­Criticisms against this theory are that it emphasizes rational, conscious thought whereas in the realm     of sexuality, emotions are very important   ­Sexual Scripts: sexual behavior is a result of extensive prior learning that teaches us sexual etiquette and how    to interpret specific situations   ­according to this concept, we have all learned an elaborate script that tells us the who, what, when,    where and why of sexual behavior    ­example, “who” part of dominant Canadian script tells us that sex should occur with someone of the    same age, the opposite sex and of our own race    ­scripts are plans that people carry around in their heads for what they are doing and what they are   going to do and also devices for helping people remember what they have done in the past    ­Social importance of sexuality: sexuality has been seen to be important in all cultures, even those that are    sexually repressed. Reiss’ explanation for the universal importance of sexuality points to two components   i) sexuality is associated with great physical pleasure   ii) sexual interactions are associated with personal self­disclosure, not only of one’s body but thoughts/    feelings as well    ­sexuality is linked to social structure in three areas   a) kinship system: since sex is linked to reproduction, always linked to kinship, kin defines what    relationships are and are not acceptable, enforces the resulting norms/ rules, explains sexual    jealousy    b) power structure: powerful groups in any society generally seek to control the sexuality of the    less powerful (males and females are examples)    c) ideology of society: ideologies are fundamental assumptions about human nature of a culture,    societies define carefully what sexual practices are normal/ abnormal, right/wrong    Chapter 3: Theoretical Perspectives on Sexuality ­Research puts beliefs, opinions and theories to the systematic test, goals of sex research:   ­creating basic knowledge and understanding   ­can be directed toward enhancing our understanding in order to influence sexual behavior   ­research can be geared toward public policy    ­can inform laws and regulations on variety of issues (eg. access to emergency contraceptive, sex work, porn, etc) ­Sampling: first steps of conducting research is to identify population of people being studied, from this population, a sample  can be taken. Many ways of obtaining a representative sample:   ­probability sampling: using stats to find an appropriate sample from the population, subtypes include   ­random sampling: researcher selects participants randomly from pool   ­stratified random sampling: researcher has higher probability of choosing participants of certain genre   ­sampling proceeds in 3 phases: population identified, method for obtaining sample adopted, sample contacted   ­problem of refusal (non­response): when chosen participants refuse to take part in study    ­results in volunteer bias: distortions of data due to choices of participants   ­type of people who volunteer correlates to data of sex study   ­convenience sample: strictly volunteers vs. probability sample: randomly chosen   ­sexual activity was higher in convenience sample ­Accuracy of self reports of sexual behavior: inaccuracies can occur in the following ways;   ­Purposeful distortion: intentionally giving self reports that are distortions of reality (enlargement or    concealment)   ­social desirability: give distortions that they think will be more accepted by researcher    ­Memory: some respondents cannot accurately recall sexual events from years ago   ­solution is to get participants to use diary during duration of study, record periodically   ­Difficulties with estimates: asking for time estimates (eg. how long do you foreplay for), cannot pinpoint exactly   ­Interpreting the question: varies depending on the individual (eg. how many sexual partners have you had?)   ­Evidence on the reliability of self reports: several methods for assessing how reliable peoples reports are:   ­test­retest: respondent answers series of questions, reasked after period of time   ­correlation between responses measures reliability (1.0 = perfect)   ­obtaining info from two different people who share sexual activity (eg. husband/ wives): usually have high    level of agreement   ­Interviews vs. questionnaires: three methods of collecting data have been used for large scale surveys:   i) face­to­face interview: advantage is that respondent/ researcher can establish rapport, clarification is    available, more flexible, can be administered to persons who cannot read or write   ­may be more biased since it is more personal than questionnaires    ii) phone interview   iii) written questionnaire   ­recent innovation of computer assisted self interview method (CASI): combined with audio, reads questions   ­offers privacy of written questionnair while accommodating poor readers  ­Web based surveys: can recruit much larger samples, potentially produce broader samples than traditional survey methods   ­eliminates prejudice, gays/ lesbians/ trans can respond without being judged   ­have ability to eliminate extraneous influences on responding (eg. gender, etc)   ­disadvantages; does not eliminate volunteer bias (eg. what about those who don’t have internet?) ­Self reports vs. direct observations: direct observations are expensive and time consuming, only have a small sample studied,  is sexual behavior in lab same as sexual behavior in privacy of own home?  ­Extraneous factors: gender, race, age all may influence outcomes. ­Ethical issues: especially difficult in sex research because participan
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 2075

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit