Textbook Notes (359,268)
Canada (156,147)
Psychology (4,647)
Chapter 11

Psych2043: Chapter 11 - Visual Impairment.docx
Psych2043: Chapter 11 - Visual Impairment.docx

7 Pages
116 Views
Unlock Document

School
Western University
Department
Psychology
Course
Psychology 2043A/B
Professor
Esther Goldberg
Semester
Winter

Description
CHILDREN WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS (Chapter 11) The Human Eye ­ Size is approximately 1 inch wide, deep, and 0.9 inches tall ­ 3 parts: ­ Eye­wall – outside ­ 3 layers: ­ Outer ­ Sclera – covers entire eye; white layer; keeps shape and  protects from trauma ­ Cornea – transparent part in front; deflects/bends light  entering eye ­ Extraocular muscles – move the eye; attached to sclera ­ Middle ­ Iris – colored part surrounding pupil; two muscles make it  smaller (pupil larger) and larger (pupil smaller) ­ Color determined by color of connective tissue  and pigment cells (less pigment = blue, more =  brown) ­ Controls amount of light entering eye ­ Lens – focuses/bends light onto retina; changes shape to  accommodate objects at distances (cilliary muscles) ­ Inner ­ Retina – back part of inner eye; concave in shape; seeing  part of eye ­ Chemical converts light to electrical impulses ­ Nerve fibres collect at back of eye and form optic  nerve to conduct impulses to brain ­ Fovea – sensitive spot on retina; contains rod cells (low  light vision) and cone cells (color vision) ­ Vitreous humour – gelatinous fluid giving the form ­ Optic nerve – connects eye to brain  Vision Elements ­ Acuity – the clarity/sharpness of vision ­ Tested by reading a Snellen eye chart from 20 feet away ­ Other versions use pictures or the letter E ­ 20/20 vision – you see what typical humans see at 20 feet (normal) ­ 20/40 – you see at 20 what typically is seen at 40 (worse) ­ 20/200 is cutoff for legal blindness *Vision can be better than normal (10/20) ­ Field – area in space visualized by the eye without moving the head; total area in which  objects can be seen in peripheral vision while eye is focused on central point ­ Images from the right side travel from both eyes to the left side of the brain ­ Damage to left brain causes loss of vision in right field of both eyes ­ Monocular visual field – amount visible to each eye ­ Binocular visual field – amount both eyes see together ­ Nasal field – area from vertical midline towards the nose ­ Temporal field – area from vertical midline to the ear ­ Superior visual field – area above the horizontal midline ­ Inferior visual field – area below the horizontal midline ­ Normal field = 50 degrees superior, 60 nasally, 70 inferior, 90 temporally ­ Testing maps a visual field by documenting amount of peripheral vision ­ Visual field defect – a portion of the field is missing ­ Large deficits = anopsias ­ Smaller deficits = scotomas ­ Labeled with prefix to indicate regions ­ Hemi – loss of vision in one half of the visual field ­ Homonymous – loss in half of the field on the same side  in both eyes ­ Bitemporal – loss of temporal side of visual field in both  eyes = tunnel vision (vs. binasal) ­ Relative scotomas – area in field where objects of low luminance are not  seen but brighter ones are ­ Deficits occur from stroke or brain injury ­ If field loss is small and not centered, it doesn’t usually cause problems ­ May become afraid of venturing out, get lost easily, and seem clumsy ­ Problems with mobility and daily activities ­ Color ­ Color blindness – person is unable to distinguish certain colors/shades of colors  (either red or green cones are not functioning) ­ Most common type is red­green – confuse the two ­ Occurs in 8% males and 0.4% females ­ Inherited disorder  ­ Affects men more because they only have one X chromosome ­ Can be caused by eye diseases, damage to retina, aging, etc. ­ No absolute treatment but methods and techniques to help ­ Inability to see any color (see only grey) is rare Vision Development ­ Vision develops gradually over 6­8 months ­ Nerve cells in retina and brain are not fully developed at birth ­ Eyes are about 70% of adult size at birth; continue to grow for 2 years ­ If born before 37 weeks there is a risk for eye problems (increasing with earlier) ­ 1 month old ­ Can’t focus past 1 foot away (low acuity) ­ Black and white at first and color develops about 1 week after birth ­ Cannot use eyes together ­ 2 months ­ Distinguish colors and show preference for bright, primary colors ­ 3­4 months ­ Start to follow objects, move eyes independently of head ­ Coordinate eye movements ­ Depth perception develops (locate object, reach out, grasp it) ­ 5 months ­ Ability to see in full color ­ Fuse pictures from both eyes – binocularity ­ Acuity, depth perception, and tracking improve ­ Object permanence ­ 6 months ­ Eye­hand coordination improved ­ Spatial and dimensional awareness ­ Acuity close to 20/20 and full color vision ­ 7­12 months ­ Eye­body coordination (with crawling) ­ Rapid development of visual perception skills ­ Eyes may change color (darker pigments develop) Visual Impairments ­ Visual impairment is an umbrella for all levels of vision loss (total blindness to  uncorrectable visual limitations) ­ Functional loss of vision, not specific to an eye disorder ­ Most have low vision – lower than normal even with correction (vs. functional  blindness) ­ Legal definition – depends on acuity and field measurements ­ Blindness ­ best corrected acuity 20/200 or worse in the better eye or visual field  20 degrees or less ­ Partially sighting – distance acuity 20/70 or less in better eye ­ Driving in Canada – ineligible to drive/limited to daytime if 20/50 or worse ­ Educational definition – depends on how well they function ­ Blind/low vision if – partial or total impairment of sight that even with  correction affects educational performance ­ Requires adaptations in presentation, nature of materials, and environment ­ Low vision – vision is primary sensory channel ­ Functionally blind – limited vision for functional tasks, tactile and  auditory channels are for learning ­ Totally blind – tactile and auditory channels for learning Classifying Impairments ­ Severity ­ Judged based on the better eye with best possible correction ­ Mild vision loss – 20/30 to 20/60 ­ Function without special training, using corrective lenses ­ Moderate visual impairment – 20/70 to 20/160 ­ Require specialized aids and lighting ­ Legal blindness – 20/400 and worse *10% have no vision; most have light perception to okay acuity ­ Severe visual impairment 20/200 to 20/400 ­ Standard correction gives little benefit ­ Profound – 20/500 to 20/1,000 *Less than 20/1,000 = near­total blindness – can still distinguish  light or dark ­ No light perception (NLP) – total blindness ­ Low vision (moderate and severe loss) + Blindness == all visual impairment *Changed definition – uses presenting visual acuity rather than best corrected –  includes refractive errors 
More Less

Related notes for Psychology 2043A/B

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit