Textbook Notes (368,122)
Canada (161,660)
Sociology (1,755)
Chapter

2205 chapter notes.docx

20 Pages
254 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2206A/B
Professor
Nicholas Spence
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 1: Why Should I Want to Learn Statistics? Jan 9 th Probabilities: sampling error: Chapter 2: How Much Math Do I Need th To Learn Statistics? Jan 9 order of operations: y=ax+b b=value where the trend line (*line of best fit* or the least squares regression line) crosses y­axis  when x­axis is 0 a=slope of the line (rate line goes up or down as x ^) Exponents ­ add exponents if bases are the same ­ inverse function of an exponent is the root 2 =4, then square root 4=2 Logarithms ­ special form of exponent, base either 10 (common logs) or 2.718 (transcendental #) ­ transcendental numbers, not algebraic, not form of fraction, irrational #’s ­ natural logs = 2.718 ­ inverse function of exponent is the root, inverse of a log is the base Levels of Measurement ­ nominal (how many marathon runners are from each country?) Identifies observations but does not allow them to be ranked or the difference between observations to be  calculated numbers only name things isn’t possible to rank subjects based on value or usefully measure distances between response categories Chapter 2: How Much Math Do I Need th To Learn Statistics? Jan 9 religion, sin number, hair colour ­ ordinal (who came in first, second, and third place in the marathon?) provides information about how each observation is ranked can be placed into an order/ranked relative to other subjects, not assess difference in skills cant rank exact distance/difference between values of the variable scale of strongly agree/disagree ­ interval (on a scale 1­5 how did each competitor feel as they crossed the finish line?) allows for the difference between observations to be measured but the value of zeros has no qualitative  difference when compared to the value of one can be organized into an order  can be + or – but NOT x or \ number of conservative votes, number of chapters read by students before an exam temp in Celsius, b/c 0 point is statistically arbitrary less common than ratio ­ ratio (how much time did it take to cross the finish line?) has a meaningful zero and allows for the exact difference between observations to be measured rank individuals, accurately measure distance between them +,­,x,\ 0 means there is none of what you are measuring can be in fractions/decimals don’t have set intervals age, income, body temperature, airfare ticket prices ­ primary distinction = relationship between different possible values of the variable categorical variable: nominal level of measurement continuous variable: interval/ratio levels of measurement ­ ordinal variables can be considered either or, depending on the situation ordinal with 2 or 3 levels considered to be categorical, greater than 3 values are continuous (this  generalization can be problematic) th Chapter 3: Univariate Statistics Jan 14 Frequencies Chapter 3: Univariate Statistics Jan 14 th frequency: tell us the number of times an item/response category comes up in a sample Typically used for nominal or ordinal data ­ Bar charts Response categories always on x­axis Frequencies on y­axis Title only describe the output and data sets; should not impose interpretation of data set axis titles should be brief and non repetitive  axis scales should present data as efficiently as possible, without too many numbers numbers should be listed in equal increments, so scale is consistent for each axis legends appear alongside bar charts, always useful list data source, usually in smaller font below chart, if any notes include those too Rates and Ratios Ratio: # of observations in one category compared to the number of observation in another category Compare categorical and continuous data Rates: closely related to ratios, BUT the denominator is usually a round number/intuitive number Used to present continuous data One of the most common methods for presenting univariate data Standardized:  Chapter 3: Univariate Statistics Jan 14 th Percentile 50  percentile = median percentiles rank you n relation to your peers, not jus on a sale of 100 that doesn’t relate you to anyone else PG 25*** 78,067,041.17 the same in 10 years with no growth rate or 1.3152…. 3,846.44 34,194,937= ? * 3,846.441351 Chapter 4: Intro to Probability Jan 16 th probability: # between 0 and 1 (0­100%), 0 refers to an event that never occurs, 1 to an event that  definitely occurs central to sampling distributions and hypothesis testing sample space: contains all of the theoretically possible outcomes of an event each probability is a fraction of the sample space sum of probabilities of all possible outcomes = 1 probability of occurrence of an event is 1 – the probability that it won’t occur random variable: has a value that is the result of a process or experiment, such as tossing a coin or  splitting an atom law of large numbers: if you repeat a random experiment many, many times your outcomes will  approach a level of “stability” more times, probability increases Empirical versus Theoretical Probabilities empirical probability: theoretical probability: using powers of deduction, determine through relative to other variable Discrete Probabilities Clearly defined non overlapping outcomes Variables often have equal probability of happening Aka simple probabilities Chapter 4: Intro to Probability Jan 16 th Probability of unrelated events ­ one event does not affect the probability of another event = independent calculate 2 discrete probabilities p(A) and p(B) use the multiplication rule of probabilities observing 2 independent outcomes in succession is equal to the product of the probability of the two  individual outcomes p(A and B) = p(A) * p(B) Probability of related events ­ one event affects the probability of another event = dependent pull green marble out 10/40 = ¼ then pull out red 10/39 p(A then B) = p(A) * p(B|A) ▯ probability of b given a  Mutually Exclusive Probabilities that are Interchangeable ­ to determine the probability of either of 2 event occurring rolling a 1 or a 6 use addition rule of probabilities p(one) = 1/6, p(six) = 1/6, p(one or six) = 1/6 + 1/6 = 1/3 Non­Mutually Exclusive or Interchangeable Probabilities ­ when 2 events can occur simultaneously ­ danger of double counting values double counted need to be subtracted ­ how to calculate calculate p(A) then p(B) subtract the number of duplications  p(A or B) = p(A) + p(B) – p(
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 2206A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit