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Canada (161,962)
Sociology (1,781)
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Chapter 8

Chapter 8 – Sentencing.docx

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Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2253A/B
Professor
Laura Huey
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 8 – Sentencing  Sentencing Options Fine Option Program: a program that provides offenders who cannot pay a fine with the  opportunity to discharge, through community service work, all or part of the fine.  Community Service Order: can be a condition of an adult probation order Ex. sorting material at a recycling depot Concurrent Sentences: rolled into one time period and served simultaneously Ex. 2 concurrent terms of imprisonment of 8 months each, will serve 8 months –  not 16 Consecutive Sentences: run separately and one after the other Ex. sentenced to 2 prison terms of 3 years each will serve a 6 year sentence  Judicial Determination: order that a federal inmate serve half of the sentence before  becoming eligible for parole Judicial Restraint Order: may lay an information before a justice of peace if you have  reasonable grounds to believe another person will injure you, your spouse, children or  property How do Judges Decide? ­ 3 steps in decision making of trial judges:  o identifying relevant factors in the case o identifying relevant law o combining relevant facts and law to produce the correct outcome  ­ seeks to impose a sentence that fits the crime, reflects going rate for similar  offences and take into account of offender’s circumstances  ­ criminal code: 2 similar crimes committed by 2 similar offenders in similar  circumstances should draw similar sentences  Maximum Sentences: every sentence has a maximum that a judge cannot exceed – if no  max is specified for an indictable offence the max allowed is 5 years Mandatory minimum sentences(MMS): several offences that carry mandatory  minimum sentences.  Ex. using a firearm during an offence carries a minimum sentence of one year in  prison for the first conviction Aggravating Factors: certain factors in a particular offence can result in a more severe  sentence than would normally be imposed Ex. abuse of spouse or child, previous criminal record, break of trust Mitigating Factors: an offence that point toward a more lenient factors than usual Ex. intoxication?, lack of premeditation,
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