Textbook Notes (368,986)
Canada (162,320)
Sociology (1,816)
Chapter

blackchpt2.docx

3 Pages
85 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2260A/B
Professor
Daphne Heywood
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter Two: Stratification Stratification ­ vertical aspect of social life ­ in a broad sense it is the inequality of wealth  ­ has several variable aspects o vertical distance: magnitude of a difference in wealth o vertical segmentation: degree to which wealth is distributed into layers, each separate  from the next (not a continuum) ­ it varies across space and time, across societies, and the settings of a single society , among  individuals and groups, within and between families, organizations, tribes, and nations  ­ explains law in quantity and style: long recognized that wealthier people have a legal advantage  Quantity of Stratification ­ is the vertical distance between the people of a social setting  ▯measured by the difference in  wealth between each person or group and every other  o also measured by difference between lowest and highest among them ­ * as long as quantity(dollar, grain, cattle) is the same it is possible to compare the quantity of  stratification across space and time  ­ law varies DIRECTLY with stratification o the more stratification a society has, the more law it has o there is less law where people are more equal   ex. eskimos don’t really have laws  ­ in modernizing societies law comes first to towns and cities and last to the bush where tradition is  still strong ­ less law among friends/neighbours wherever people are more equal ­ people of different ranks are more likely to take their problems to court o unequal neighbours are more likely to litigate their boundary dispute o husband and wife with origins in different social classes are more likely to take their  marital dispute to court and the judge is MORE likely to grant a divorce  ­ stratification varies between a citizen and a legal official  o ex. poor man might be indicted on a serious charge by wealthier members of a jury, but  exonerated later by a jury of his peers ­ just as law increases with stratification of the world over centuries, it increases with the  stratification of any relationship at all Vertical Location  ­ law varies directly with rank o all else constant lower ranks have less law than the higher ranks o ex. black offending a black was punished less severely than a white offending  white  ­ groups have wealth as well – each group has a rank o law varies directly with the rank of groups not only among themselves but in relation to  individuals ­ the more wealth a society has in relation to other societies, the more law it has  ­ industrialized societies have more law than less developed societies  Vertical Direction ­ complaint by a wealthy man against a poor man has a downward direction, as does a complaint  by a poor man against someone with still less wealth  ­ vertical direction of law is opposite of that of deviant behaviour o in response to upward deviance, law has a downward direction o in response to downward deviance its direction is upward o law has a vertical direction whenever it moves between different ranks ­ downward law is greater than upward law  ­ upward deviance is more serious than downward deviance  o ex. victim who is above the offender in rank is more likely to call the police than a victim  whose rank is lower than the offender’s  ­ more difficult to win an upward than a downward case  ­ upward crime
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 2260A/B

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit