Textbook Notes (368,399)
Canada (161,862)
Sociology (1,780)
Chapter 2

Chapter Two.txt

6 Pages
125 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 2240E
Professor
Amanda Zavitz
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter Two   Karl Marx   Introduction  His most famous work was The Manifesto of the Communist Party  Marx's main interest was in the historical basis of inequality   His theory is an analysis of inequality under capitalism and how to change it  The Dialectic   Dialectical philosophy  centrality of contradiction   believes that contradictions exist in reality and that the most appropriate way to understand reality is to  study the development of those contradictions  Marx also accepts the centrality of contradictions to historical change.   Marx did not believe that these contradictions could be worked out in our understanding (in our minds).  Such contradictions are resolved by a life and death struggle that changes the social world   The dialectic leads to an interest in the conflicts and contradictions among various levels of social reality   For example, one of the contradictions within capitalism is the relationship between the workers and the  capitalists who own the factories and other means of production with which the work is done.   The capitalists must exploit the workers in order to make a profit form the workers' labour.   The workers, in contradiction to the capitalists, want to keep at least some of the profit from themselves.  Marx believes that this contradiction was at the heart of capitalism.   This contradiction can not be solved through philosophy, but only through social change.   Fact and Value   Social values are not separable from social facts  The dialectical thinker believe that its not only impossible to keep values out of the study of the social world,  but also undesirable because to do so would produce a dispassionate, inhuman sociology that has little to  offer to people in search of answers to the problems they confront.  Reciprocal Relations   Does not see a simple, one­way cause and effect   One factor may have an effect on another, but it is just as likely that the latter will have a simultaneous  effect on the former.   Example: the increasing exploitation of the workers by the capitalist may cause the works to become  increasingly dissatisfied and more militant, but the increasing militancy of the proletariat may well use the  capitalists t react by becoming even more exploitative in order to crush the resistance of the workers.   Past, Present, Future   The dialectical sociologists are concerned with studying the historical roots of the contemporary word as  Marx did   Many dialectical thinkers are attuned to current social trends in order to understand the possible future  directions of society  No Inevitabilities   Does not imply that the future is determined by the present   The future may be based on some contemporary model, but not inevitably   Marx hoped and believed that the future was to be found in communism   Communism would come only through their choices and struggles   Disinclination to think deterministically is what makes the best­known model of the dialectic  thesis,  antithesis, synthesis  inadequate for sociological use   Actors and Structures   increasingly in the dynamic relationship between actors and social structures   Human Potential   Marx believed that there was a real contradiction between our human potential and the way that we must  work in capitalist society   To understand human potential, we need to understand social history, because human nature is shaped by  the same dialectical contradictions that Marx believed shapes the history of society   When speaking of our general human potential, Marx used the term species being.   Species Being  the potentials and powers that are uniquely human and that distinguish humans from other  species   Labour   For Marx, species being and human potential are intimately related to labour   1. What distinguishes us from other animals  our species being  is that our labour creates something in  reality that previously existed only in our imagination. Marx calls this processes in which we create external  objects out of our internal thought objectification.   2. This labour is material. It works with the more material aspects of nature in order to satisfy material  needs.   3. Marx believed that this labour does not just transform the material aspects of nature, but also transforms  us, including our needs, our consciousness, and our human nature. Labour is thus at the same time a) the  objectification of our purpose, b) the establishment of an essential relation between human need and the  material objects of our need c) the transformation of our human labour  Labour  encompasses all productive actions that transform that material aspects of nature in accordance  with our purpose   Labour is in response to a need, and the transformation that labour entails also transforms our needs. The  satisfaction of our needs can lead to the creation of new needs, which leads to new forms of productive  activity.   Labour, for Marx, is the development of our truly human powers and potentials. By transforming material  relative to fit our purpose, we also transform ourselves. Labour is a social activity. Labour does not  transform only the individual, but the society as well.   Alienation   there is an inherent relation between labour and human nature, he thought this relation is perverted by  capitalism. He calls this alienation   We no longer see our labour as an expression of our purpose. There is no objectification. Rather than being  an end in itself  an expression of human capabilities  labour in capitalism is reduced to being a means to an  end: ending money   Because our labour is not our own, it no longer transforms us, instead we are alienated from our labour and  therefore our true human nature.   Four components of alienation  1. Workers in capitalist society are alienated form their productive activity. They do not produce objects  according to their own ideas or to directly satisfy their own needs.   Productive activity in capitalism is reduced, to an often boring  means to the fulfilment of the only end that  really matters in capitalism: earning enough money to survive.   2.  Workers in capitalism society are alienated not only from productive activities but also from the object of  those activities  the product. The produce of their labour belongs not to the workers, but to the capitalists.   3. Workers in the capitalist society are alienated from their fellow workers. Marx's assumption was that  people basically need and want to work cooperatively in order to appropriate from nature what they require  to survive. But in capitalism this cooperation is disrupted, and people, often strangers are forced to work  side by side for the capitalist.   To extract maximum productivity and to prevent the development of cooperative relationships, the capitalists  pits one workers against another to see who can produce more, work more quickly or please the boss  more. The workers who succeed are given a few extra rewards.   4. Workers in capitalist society are alienated form their own human potential. Instead of being a source of  transformation and fulfilment of our human nature, the workplace is where we feel least human.    The Structures of Capitalist Society   Marx's work on human nature and alienation led him to a critique on capitalist society and to a political  program oriented to overcoming the structures of capitalism so that people could express their essential  humanityt   Capitalism is an economic system in which great numbers of workers who own little produce commodities  for the proift of small number sof capitslists who own all of the following: the commodities, the means of  producing the commodities, and the labour time of the workers, which they purchase through wages.   Captialsits are bale to coerce workers through their power to dismiss workers and close plants. Capitalism,  therefore, is not simply and economic system: it is also a political system, a mode of exercising power, and  a process for exploiting workers.   Commodities  Commodities, or products of labour, are intended primarily for exchange   These objects are produced for personal use or for use by others in the immediate environmen
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 2240E

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit