Textbook Notes (369,035)
Canada (162,359)
Biology (396)
BI111 (135)
Tristan Long (112)
Chapter 28

Chapter 28.docx

7 Pages
56 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BI111
Professor
Tristan Long
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 28.1­28.4­Transport in Plants 28.1a Short Distance Transport mechanisms move molecules across plant  cell membranes. Two mechanisms for transporting molecules across a plasma membrane is passive transport and  active transport. Passive transport moves substances with their concentration gradient which means that the cells  do not need to expend energy. Passive includes both transport of simple diffusion (nonpolar molecules and small polar molecules)  and facilitated diffusion (transport of polar and charged molecules that move across the membrane  via transport proteins). Active transport moves ions and large molecules across membranes via transport proteins, since  solutes are being moved against their concentration gradient, cells must expend energy. The energy for active transport can be provided either by ATP hydrolysis or by harnessing the  energy in concentration gradient. Cells gain and lose water by osmosis, the passive transport of water across a selectively  permeable membrane either by simple diffusion or by facilitated diffusion through water­conducing  channel proteins called aquaporin’s. Whether water will move into or out of a given cell is determined by water potential 28.1b The relationship between Osmosis and Water Potential  Water potential is measured in megapascals(MPa) Factors that determine water potential are the presence of solutes and physical pressure. The effect of dissolved solutes on water potential is called solute potential. When solutes are added to water, they disrupt some of the hydrogen bonding between water  molecules and the polar water molecules interact with the solutes, forming a hydration bonding  between water molecules, and the polar water molecules interact with the solutes, forming a  hydration shell that surrounds the solute molecules.  Water potential is lower in a solution with more solutes than in pure water while solution containing  solutes will have values less than zero. The relationship between water potential and solute potential is vital to understanding transport in  plant because water movies by osmosis.  Pressure can also change how water moves. If we exert a positive pressure on the water, giving it more energy than the water in the other side of  u­tube, causing water to flow to that side. If we pull on the plunger, reducing its energy, pulling water from the other side of the u­tube to the  side under tension. 28.1c Osmosis in Plant cells creates Turgor Pressure, which is necessary for plant support  most of the volume of a mature plant cell is occupied by a large central vacuole, which is  surrounded by a vascular membrane(tonoplast). Cells that enter a plant cell are transported from the cytoplasm into the central vacuole through ion  channels in the tonoplast. The pressure of water­filled vacuole and cytoplasm against the wall keeps the cell firm known as  turgor pressure. As long as the water potential of soil is higher than that of the root epidermal cells, water will follow  the water potential gradient and flow into root cells, making them turgid. If soul around the roots dries out, the soul water potential becomes more negative than that of root  epidermal cells and water no longer flows into the roots from soil. When turgor pressure in the cells of leaves and stems drops to very low levels, it is called wilting.  28.2a Water travels across the root to the root xylem by two pathways Minerals can either travel  by two paths: across the root to the xylem, either through interconnected  cytoplasm of living cells or through cell walls and intercellular spaces.  Living cells make up the symplast (inner side of the plasma membrane) and are interconnected by  plasmodesmata, allow water to flow from the cytoplasm of one cell to the next via the symplastic  pathway.  The continuous network of cell walls and spaces between cell makes up the nonliving areas of the  root or the apoplast.  Water moves through the apoplastic pathway as it flows through these nonliving spaces without  crossing plasma membranes.  When water enters a root some diffuses into the symplast but most enters into the apopplast.  Apoplastic water travels inward until it encounters the endodermis, the innermost layer of the  cortex. Endodermal cells are tightly packed. Each endodermal cell also has a ribbonlike Casparian strip in its radical and transverse walls The Casparian strip is impregnated with suberin, a waxy substance that is impermeable to water  and blocks the apoplastic movement of water at the endodermis.  Once the water reaches the casparian strip, they are forced to detour from the apoplast, moving  across the plasma membrane of endodermal cells and into the symplastic pathway.  Finally, the water then pass through plasmodesmata in the outer layer of stele.  The casparian strips allow the endodermis to control which substances enter and leave a plant’s  vascular tissue. 28.2b Roots take up ions by Active Transport  Ions can enter the symplast immediately and travel to the xylem via the symplastic pathway or they  can move inward following the apoplastic pathway until they reach the casparian strip if the  endodermis.  Once the ion reaches the stele, it diffuses from cell to cell until it is loaded into the xylem.  28.3 Long­Distance Transport of Water and Minerals in the xylem.  How does the solution of water and minerals called xylem sap move up?  Inside a plant’s tube­like vascular tissue, a large amounts of water travel by bull flow­ the mass  movement of molecules in response to a difference in pressure between two locations The driving force for the upward movement of xylem sap  is the evaporation of water from leaves  and other above ground parts of land plants.  Transpiration is able to pull xylem sap upward through the plant body because of the cohesion of  water molecules and the tension created by the evaporation of water from plant surfaces. 23.a The properties of water play a key role in its transport Two properties of water which are important in water movement in the xylem: Water molecules are strong cohesive: they tend to form hydrogen bonds with one another. Water molecules are adhesive: they form hydrogen bonds with molecules of other substances,  including carbohydrates in plant cell walls.  Both these properties pull water molecules into small spaces.  Henry Dixon of xylem transport is now called the cohesion­tension theory of water transport. According to the theory, water transport begins as water evaporates from the walls of mesophyll  cells inside leaves and the intercellular spaces. When a water molecule moves out of a leaf vein into the mesophyll, its hydrogen bonds with the  next molecule in line stretch but don’t break.  The stretching creates tension­ a negative pressure gradient­in the column, Adhesion of the water column adds to the tension. Under tension, the entire column of water pulls upward. As the soil dries, the remaining water molecules are held tightly; this tension pulls the water  molecules close
More Less

Related notes for BI111

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit