Textbook Notes (368,774)
Canada (162,158)
Geography (106)
GG231 (31)
Rob Milne (27)
Chapter 8

chapter 8 floods.docx

9 Pages
86 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Geography
Course
GG231
Professor
Rob Milne
Semester
Winter

Description
FLOODS­ Lesson 7 Introduction to rivers: Streams and rivers are part of the hydrologic cycle. Water evaporates from Earth’s  surface, primarily from the oceans; it exists as a gas in the atmosphere; and it precipitates  on oceans and on the 30% of Earth’s surface that is land, however returns to the oceans  via surface flow along paths determined by the local topography.  ­Surface flow, referred to as runoff, finds its way to small streams, which are tributaries  of larger streams, or rivers.  ­ the region drained by a single stream is variously called a drainage basin,  watershed, river basin  or catchment. Each stream thus has its own drainage basin  that collects rain and snow.  ­ A larger river basin such as the Red river basin, is made up of hundred of small  watershed drained by smaller tributary streams  ­ The gradient of a river is greatest in its headwaters, decreases downstream, and  it’s lowest at the river mouth, which is its base level.  ­ BASE LEVEL of a river is the lowest elevation to which it may erode.  Rivers move not only water but also a large amount of material. This material called  TOTAL LOAD, consists of bed load, suspended load, and dissolved load.  ­Bed load comprises particles of sand and gravel that slide, roll and bounce       along the river channel in rapidly moving water.  ­Suspended load­ comprises mainly silt and clay particles carried in suspension  above the riverbed. Gives rivers a muddy appearance during periods of high flow  ­Dissolved load­ comprises electrically charged atoms or molecules called ions  that are carried in solution in the water. Most of this derives from chemical  weathering of rock and sediment in the drainage basin.  FLOODING:  Overbank is termed flooding  (study case: In BC May 1894 the Fraser River flood was the  largest recorded. Caused by the unusual melt of heavy snowpack in southern BC during hot, wet  spring weather  ­ The magnitude and duration of a flood are determined by by the following  factors:  1) The amount, distribution, and duration of precipitation in the drainage  basin  2) The rate at which the precipitation soaks into the ground  3) The presence or absence of a snowpack 4) Air temperature  5) The speed at which surface runoff reaches the river  ­Water saturated soil is like a wet sponge that cannot hold additional moisture  ­Flooding will probably occur in heavy rains fall on ground that is already saturated.  ­dry soil may be able to absorb considerable moisture and thus reduce or prevent flooding  ­Flooding can also result from the piling up of water behind ice jams on rivers, the  damming of rivers by landslides, and sudden draining of lakes impounded behind  moraines, glaciers and landslide deposits  ­ Floods can happen at diff. times of the year.  ­ Their timing depends mainly on the size of the watershed and on regional climate. ­ Larger rivers in North America, like the Mississippi and Fraser—flood only in  late spring, following winters marked by abnormally heavy snow falls.  ­ Pacific coast of northwest North America, commonly flood in the fall during  periods of heavy rain after the first snow has fallen  ­ Ice­jam floods are common in northern areas of Canada and occur when rivers  freeze in the fall or more commonly break up in spring.  CASE STUDY:   Mississippi River Flood of 1973 & 1993  ­Flooded farmland in the spring of 1973. Forcing evacuation of 10 of thousands of ppl.  Few  deaths ­ Caused about US$ 1.2 billion in property damage  ­Occurred in spite of a tremendous investment in upstream flood control dams n the Missouri  River.  The flood on the Mississippi near St. Louis was record­breaking.  During the summer of 1993, the Mississippi river and its tributaries experienced one of the largest  floods of the century.  ­Flood lasted from late June to early August; caused 50 deaths and more than US$15 billion in  property damage. In all about, 55 000km^3, including variety of towns and large tracts of  farmland were inundated  ­ the 1993 flood resulted from a major weather anomaly that affected the entire U.S Midwest­ the  Mississippi and Lower Missouri river watershed. This anomaly was preceded by a wet autumn  and a heavy spring snowmelt that saturated the ground in the upper Mississippi drainage basin.  Severe flooding can also result from the intense rainfall that accompanies hurricanes and  cyclones and from the surges created by these severe storms.  ­A flood begins when a stream achieves bankfull discharge­ the discharge at which  water first flows out of the channel.  ­ HYDROGRAPH a graph showing changes in discharge, water depth or stage over time ­Flood Stage is frequently used to indicated that a river has reached a level likely to  cause property damage ­ The Recurrence Interval of a flood of a particular magnitude is the average time  between events of that magnitude.  Upstream and Downstream Floods:  Upstream floods occur in the upper parts of drainage basins and in small tributary basins  of a larger river. They are generally produced by intense rainfall of short durations over a  small area  Flash Floods­ floods that are sudden and involve a large increase in discharge. Peak  discharge can be reached in less than 10 mins. Most common in arid and semi­arid  environments, steep topography or little vegetation, ice jams and following breaks of  dams.   (most ppl. Die in cars because they think they can drive through shallow fast moving floodwaters.  A combo of buoyancy and the strong lateral force of the rushing water sweep automobiles off the road and  into deeper water. ) Upstream floods can be very damaging, as demonstrated by 2 disasters in North America  during the later 20  century:  1) In southern Quebec in 1996­ the Saguenay flood occurred on July 19 & 20 in h 1996, in the Saguenay­Lac­Sain­Jean region of southern Quebec. 2 weeks of  heavy rain filled reservoirs and raised rivers to flood stage. On July 19 about 270  mm of rain ell on the region within a few hours, an amount of equal to the total  normal July rainfall. Rivers overtopped their banks and parts of Chicoutimi and  La Baie were flooded. About 16 000 ppl. Were evacuated, more thank 26000  homes and cottages destroyed, and 10 ppl. Killed. Damage exceeded $800  million, making the flood the worst in Quebec’s history.   2) Colorado Front Range in 1976­ large flash floods occurred in July 1976 in the  Colorado front range. Caused by a system of thunderstorms that swept through  several canyons west of  Loveland and delivered up to 250 mm of rain in a few  hours. The floods killed 139 ppl. And caused more than US$ 35 million in  damage to highways, roads, bridges, homes and small businesses.  Comparable  floods have occurred in the past ad others can be expected in the future.  DOWNSTREAM floods­ affect larger areas than flash floods and are commonly much  more deadly.  ­ 2 worst natural disasters in human history were floods on the Yellow River in  China in 1887 and 1931  ­ Estimates of killed ppl  in 1887= 900 000 to 2 million.   ­ Estimates of killed ppl in 1931=850 000 to 4 million ppl. Died in a flood on the  same river in 1931(drowning, diseases,  drought)  ­ Root cause of the sever flood problem on the yellow river is geological. The river  carries an average of 37 kg of sediment per m3  of water in its lower reaches,  which is a very large sediment load.  Destructive downstream floods are common in other parts of he world:  E.g.) India suffered some of the worst floods in its history in 2005, and rivers draining the  southern Rocky Mountains in Alberta flooded during prolonged heavy rains in the same  year.  ­ in 2004 heavy rains from a series of hurricanes and tropical storms in the eastern US  caused record or near­record flooding.  In Pennsylvania, the Susquehanna River crested  2.5 above flood stage, making it one of the five greatest floods in the river’s history.  Survivor Story:  Worst flood disaster in Canadian History occurred in 1954, when Hurricane  Hazel struck Toronto ­Storm approached Ontario from the Caribbean on Oct. 13 1954, it showed signs of  weakening.  ­Warm moisture laden air came in contact with a cold front lying over southern Ontario,  producing record rainfall. From the morning of Oct. 14 to midnight on Oct15 about 210  mm of rain fell on the watersheds of several streams in Toronto  Downstream floods inundate large areas and are produced by storms of long duration or  by rapid melting of snow packs.  ­Flooding in small tributary basins is generally limited but the combined runoff from  thousands of slopes in tributary basins produces a large flood downstream.  ­ Very large, short­lived floods result from the sudden draining of glacier­,  moraine­, and landslide­dammed lakes. Many of these “outbursts” floods have  peak discharges many times larger than normal rainfall­ or snowmelt­triggered  floods in the same basin.  ­ A flood of debris and water caused by the failure of a moraine dam in the  cordillera Blanca of Peru in 1941 killed about 5000 ppl. In the city of Huaraz.   ­ Outburst floods and associated debris flows can be deadly when ppl. Live along  their paths   8.3 geographic regions at risk for flooding:  Flooding can occur along any streams or river and thus is the most widespread natural  hazard. A single flood can cause billions of dollars of property damage ad large numbers  of death.  ­Developing countries suffer much greater loss of life than developed ones cause of the  larger numbers of ppl at risk, the lack of monitoring and warning capabilities, poor  infrastructure and transportation systems, and inadequate resources available for effective  disaster relief.  e.g) 2010 flood in Pakistan­ nearly 20% of country filled covered with water. the worst flood in  the country in last 80 years—caused by persistent heavy monsoon rains in Northern Pakistan.  Killed over 2000 people and destroyed over a million home. More than 21 million people, nearly  one third of the country’s population was left homeless. Recovery takes lots of time in such poor  coutnries­ large amount of assistance from wealthy countries needed.  Flood damage may be primary­ that is, caused directly by the flood or, secondary­ resulting  from disruptions of services and systems.  Primary effects­ loss of life, injury, and damage to farms, homes, buildings, railroads, bridges,  roads and other engineered works from flowing water, debris, sediment, and inundation.  Can also  remove or bury soil and vegetation.  Secondary effects­ pollution, hunger, disease, displacement of people, and losses of services and  income. Failure 
More Less

Related notes for GG231

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit