Textbook Notes (367,936)
Canada (161,516)
Philosophy (101)
PP111 (14)
Chapter 9

PP111 Chapter 9 Notes.docx
Premium

6 Pages
53 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PP111
Professor
Gary Foster
Semester
Winter

Description
PP111 Chapter 9 Notes • One focal point of the dispute concerned the nature and reliability of sense  perception Two Perspectives on Reality • A conflict between our common sense picture of the world and our scientific  picture of the world had already been noticed by Descartes • On Descartes’ view our common sense picture of reality derived from custom,  prejudice and sense experience while our scientific picture of reality was the  result of careful reasoning and a willingness to suspend our trust in our senses Two Ideas of the Sun (Descartes) • The idea of the sun that is derived from the senses is the one that is ‘most  dissimilar to it’; but the idea of the sun derived from ‘astronomical reasoning’  involving math­ he believes is a better representation of the actual sun The Two Tables (Arthur Eddington) • Table One: familiar to me from the earliest years o Modern physics will never succeed in exorcising even if it lies visible to  my eyes and tangible to my grasp • Table Two: scientific table o Not as familiar with it o There is nothing substantial o Particles moving around within the open space o Modern physics has backed that the second table is really there Connection between Sun and Tables • Both are illustrations drawn from a much broader conflict between our common  sense and scientific pictures of the world • Both believe that between our common sense and the scientific views of the  world, the preference is to the scientific picture • Descartes and Eddington also share a common view about how perceptions work:  o Our senses give us a faulty representation of the world­ a distorted picture o Perception itself imposes a veil between us and reality • A key assumption leading them to a conclusion (observing isn’t the right way to  get to know reality at all) is their assumption: o The common sense view of the world is the view of the orld derived from  sense experience Descartes on Sense Experience • Descartes reason for not placing his trust in sense experience: o It is sometime proved to me that these senses are deceptive and it is wiser  not to trust entirely to anything by which we have once been deceived. • However, the fact that our senses sometime deceive us is itself something we only  learn by relying on our senses in better or optimal perceptual conditions • Descartes Dreams argument: o ‘I remind myself that on many occasions I have in sleep been deceived… I  see so manifestly that there are no certain indications by which we may  clearly distinguish wakefulness from sleep.’ The Argument from Dreams: A Closer Look • There are several different sorts of errors that we might blame on dreams: 1. I might have false beliefs about something while I am wide awake,  because I mistake a dream that I had for something that happened 2. I might mistakenly while I’m awake and I see a table before me, that I’m  actually sound asleep and dreaming 3. I mistakenly, while I am asleep and dreaming that I see a table before me  (when there is no table there) • His argument depends on the idea that if we are dreaming right now, then a) we  cannot know that we are dreaming and b) our senses are actually misleading us Two Reasons to Descartes’ Argument • There are two reason for being suspicious of Descartes’ claim that it does indicate  that we have false beliefs about the world while we are dreaming and how does  this indicate that our senses are unreliable source for knowledge of reality?. o Response 1: Descartes Dream Argument for scepticism of the senses based  on the idea that there is a symmetry between dreaming and waking  Just because I form unreliable beliefs when I am asleep and  dreaming that is no reason for thinking that I form unreliable  beliefs when I a wide awake and in optimal viewing conditions o Response 2:Why blame our senses for the false beliefs we acquire on  those occasions when we aren’t even using our senses (ie. asleep in  darkness with our eyes closed therefore not using senses)  If when I am dreaming, I do not employ my senses at all, then any  false beliefs that I acquire while dreaming do not establish the  unreliability of my senses The Minds Eye • Descartes appears to think that dreaming is seeing mental images with the mind’s  eye or some inner eyes o Dreaming as the things which are represented to us in sleep like painted  representations • On this view of the mistakes I make when I am dreaming, I am mistaken about  the object I am seeing, smelling and eating • Only if we assume that my mistake if of this kind do wee need to view dreams as  images or representations passing before the mind’s eye. • Homunculus: the inner person whose eyes are our mind’s eye o Idea that dreaming consists of perceiving mental images with inner  sensory organs • Descartes appears to believe that when we dream we are actually perceiving  things­ but the “things” we perceive are only mental images or representations o That is why he supposes that the false beliefs we have while dreaming  establish that perception (and not merely dreaming) cannot be trusted. o Believes that all perceiving is only the perception of images or  representations The Piece of Wax • Does the same wax remain after this change over away and then close to the fire? o We must confess that it remains o What then did I know so distinctly in this piece of wax? o It could certainly be nothing of all that the senses brought to my notice,  since all these things which fall under taste, smell, sight, touch and hearing  are found to be changed and yet the same wax remains o By the faculty of imagination but by the understanding only, and since  they are not known from the fact that they are seen or touched but only  because they are understood, I see clearly that there is nothing which is  easier for me to know than my mind. Descartes Reasoning • Descartes’ thought experiment involving the piece of wax is meant to show us that  there is something wrong with this way of thinking and talking about perception • Despite the changes we perceive the wax undergoes, we continue to think that  there is some one piece of wax that persists throughout the changes. • Descartes conclusion is that our understanding of the piece of wax as a substance  that undergoes changes of colour, shape, smell, etc is not an understanding that  could have been acquired from the information provided to us by our five senses • The truth is that we understand that wax to be the same, but we don’t perceive  anything that stays the same • Descartes thinks that the true natures of physical objects, if we could really know  them are radically different from anything we actually see, hear, smell, taste, etc. Two Theories of Perception 1. Direct Realism: a. We perceive ordinary physical objects, which exist independently of 
More Less

Related notes for PP111

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit