Textbook Notes (368,316)
Canada (161,798)
Psychology (1,957)
PS102 (318)
Chapter 9

Chapter 9 - Psychology (Reading)

6 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS102
Professor
Kathy Foxall
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 9: Thinking and Intelligence Thought: Using what we know The Elements of Cognition Concept: a mental category that groups objects, relations, activities, abstractions, or  qualities having common properties. Simplify and summarize information about the  world so that it is manageable and so that we can make decisions quickly.  Basic concepts: concepts that have a moderate number of instances and that are easier to  acquire than those having few or many instances.  Prototype: an especially representative example of a concept.  For example: which is  more representative of sports, football or weight lifting? Benjamin Lee Whorf proposed that language moulds cognition and perception. For  example: English only has one word for snow, but the Inuit have many different words  for snow (powdered snow, slushy snow, falling snow etc.), so the Intuits notice more  differences in snow than English speakers.  Overall, vocabulary and grammar affect how  we perceive things. Proposition: a unit of meaning that is made up of concepts and expresses a single idea.  Cognitive schema: an integrated mental network of knowledge, beliefs, and expectations  concerning a particular topic or aspect of the world. For example: gender schemas  represent a person’s beliefs and expectations about what it means to be male or female. Mental image: a mental representation that mirrors or resembles the thing it represents;  mental images occur in many and perhaps all sensory modalities. How Conscious Is Thought? Subconscious thinking Subconscious processes: mental processes occurring outside of conscious awareness but  accessible to consciousness when necessary. Many automatic routines are performed  “without thinking” – allows us to multitask. For example: eating and reading  simultaneously. (In daily life, multitasking is rather inefficient and can cause accidents)  Nonconscious thinking Nonconscious processes: mental processes occurring outside of and not available to  conscious awareness. For example: the odd experience of having a solution to a problem  pop up into mind after you have given up trying to find one.  Implicit learning: learning that occurs when you acquire knowledge about something  without being able to state exactly what is it you have learned. For example: some people  discover the best strategy for winning a card game without over being able to consciously  identify what they are doing. Many of our abilities, from speaking our native language  properly to walking up a flight of stairs, are the result of implicit learning. Mindlessness Mindlessness: mental inflexibility, inertia, and obliviousness to the present context.  Keeps people from recognizing when a change in a situation requires a change in  behaviour. For example: Photocopy study – those who were asked “Can I use the  photocopier first because I am in a rush?”, were more likely to agree because they heard  the content of the request. Reasoning Rationally Reasoning: the drawing of conclusions or interferences from observations, facts, or  assumptions.  Formal Reasoning: Algorithms and Logic The kind of reasoning you might find on an intelligence test or an entrance exam for  medical school. In some formal problems, all you have to do is apply and algorithm: a problem solving  strategy guaranteed to produce a solution even if the user does not know how it works.  Deductive reasoning: a form of reasoning in which a conclusion follows necessarily from  certain premises; if the premises are true, the conclusion must be true. For example: “All  human beings are mortal”, “I am a human being”, and “I am mortal”. Inductive reasoning: a form of reasoning in which the premises provide support for a  conclusion, but it is still possible for the conclusion to be false. For example: “I had three  great meals at Joe’s restaurant; they sure have good food.” No matter how much  supporting evidence you gather, it is always possible that new information will turn up to  show you are wrong. Informal Reasoning: Heuristics and Dialectical Thinking Heuristic: a rule of thumb that suggests a course of action or guides problem solving but  does not guarantee an optimal solution. For example trying to predict the stock market.  Faced with incomplete information on which to base a decision and may therefore resort  to rules of thumb that have proven effective in the past. Dialectical reasoning: a process in which opposing facts or ideas are weighed and  compared, with a view to determining the best solution or resolving differences. Consider  arguments for and against the problem.  Reflective Judgment 2 prereflective stages tend to assume that a correct answer always exists and that it can be  obtained directly through the senses and what “feels right”. 3 quasi­reflective: stages people recognize that some things cannot be known with  absolute certainty and realize that judgments should be supported by reasons, but still  only pay attention to evidence that supports their belief. Tend to use, “We all have a right  to our own opinion”.  2 reflective stages: people start to understand that nothing is certain and are willing to  consider evidence from a variety of sources and reason dialectically.  Barriers to Reasoning Rationally Exaggerating the Improbable (and Minimizing the Probable) This explains why so many people enter lotteries and buy disaster insurance.  Affect heuristic: the tendency to consult one’s emotions instead of estimating  probabilities objectively. Can be misleading. For example: during reported dangers of  “mad cow disease”, beef consumption fell drastically. When a doctor published that it  was safe and no longer a concern, beef consumption stayed the same. People focused  more on the dangers of getting mad cow, and paid little attention to the reality. Availability heuristic: the tendency to judge the probability of a type of event by how  easy it is to think of examples or instances. For example: new accounts of avalanches  make people fear skiing even though other aspects of skiing are more dangerous, like not  wearing a helmet.  Avoiding Loss Framing effect: the tendency for people’s choices to be affected by how a choice is  presented, or framed; for example, whether it is worded in terms of potential losses or  gains.  For example: “condom has 95% success rate”, or same condom worded with  “condom has a 5% failure rate”. The Fairness Bias There are some circumstances where we try to avoid loss altogether. If your friend has  $20, and you play a game to decide how much he will give you, you will accept any offer  given, as it is better than nothing.  The Hindsight Bias The tendency to overestimate one’s ability to have predicted an event once the outcome is  known; the “I knew it all along phenomenon”. The Confirm
More Less

Related notes for PS102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit