Textbook Notes (368,318)
Canada (161,798)
Psychology (1,957)
PS102 (318)
Chapter 8

Chapter 8 Detailed Notes.docx

10 Pages
115 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS102
Professor
Kathy Foxall
Semester
Winter

Description
The Cognitive Revolution ­ 19th Century focus on the mind ­ Introspection ­ Behaviorist focus on overt responses Arguments regarding incomplete picture of human functioning ­ Empirical study of cognition – 1956 conference ­ Simon and Newell – problem solving ­ Chomsky – new model of language ­ Miller – memory Language: Turning Thoughts into Words o Language consists of symbols that convey meaning, plus rules for combining those symbols,  that can be use to generate a infinite variety of messages Properties of Language 1. Symbolic: spoken sounds and written words to represent objects, actions, events and ideas 2. Semantic: meaningful 3. Generative: limited number of symbols can be combined in an infinite variety of ways to  generate an endless array of novel messages 4. Structured: although people can generate an infinite variety of sentences, these sentences  must be structured in a limited number of ways The Hierarchical Structure of Language ­ Phonemes = smallest speech units, how certain letters sound 100 possible, English – about 40 ­ Morphemes = smallest unit of meaning 50,000 in English, root words, prefixes, suffixes ­ Semantics = meaning of words and word combinations ­ Syntax = a system of rules for arranging words into sentences ­ Different rules for different languages ­ Basic sounds are combined into units with meaning, which are combined into  words, which are combined into phrases, which are combined into sentences. ­ Phonemes are the smallest units of speech. Research indicates that there are  about 100 possible phonemes, but most languages use between 20­80, English  about 40. ­ Morphemes are the smallest units of meaning in a language, consisting of root  words, prefixes, and suffixes. S has meaning beyond being a letter (pluralization). ­ Semantics refer to the meaning of words and word combinations. Learning  semantics involves learning the variety of objects and actions to which words  refer. ­ Syntax is a system of rules for arranging words into sentences. Different  languages have different rules. (Verb or subject first in a sentence?) Language Development: Milestones Moving To Producing Words ­ 3 year old infants can distinguish phonemes all of the world’s languages ­ Initial vocalizations similar across languages ­ Crying, cooing, babbling ­ 6 months – babbling sounds begin to resemble surrounding language Using Words ­ 1 year – first word ­ Similar cross­culturally – words for parents ­ 10­13 months of age, most children begin to utter sounds that correspond to words – most infant’s  first words are similar in phonetic form and meaning – ex. Papa, mama, dada ­ Receptive vs. expressive language ­ Fast mapping is the process by which children map a word onto an underlying concept after only  one exposure ­ An overextension occurs when a child incorrectly uses a word to describe a wider set of objects or  actions that it is meant to ­ Under extensions occur when a child incorrectly uses a word to describe a narrower set of objects  or actions than it is meant to Combining Words ­ Children typically begin to combine words into sentences near the end of their second year ­ Telegraphic speech consists mainly of content words; articles prepositions, and other less critical  words are omitted – ex. “Give doll” ­ Over regularizations occur when grammatical rules are incorrectly generalized to irregular cases  where they do not apply – ex. “I hatted the ball” Refining Language Skills ­ Youngsters make their largest strides in language development in their first 4­5 years ­ Continue to refine language during school years ­ Metalinguistic awareness Learning More than One Language: Bilingualism ­ Bilingualism is the acquisition of two languages that use different speech sounds, vocabulary, and  grammatical rules ­ Smaller vocabularies in one language, combined vocabularies average ­ Higher scores for middle­class bilingual subjects on cognitive flexibility, analytical reasoning,  selective attention, and metalinguistic awareness ­ Slight disadvantage in terms of language processing speed ­ Second languages more easily acquired early in life ­ Greater acculturation facilitates acquisition ­ Develop executive control earlier and can juggle tasks more efficiently Does Learning 2 Languages in Childhood Slow Down Language Development? ­ Some studies have found that bilingual children have smaller vocabularies in each of their  languages than monolingual children have in their one language – but when their two overlapping  vocabularies are added, their total vocabulary I similar or slightly superior to that of children  learning a single language ­ There was little evidence of language disadvantage ­ The bilingual children followed the normal pacing of language milestones, except in this case it  was accomplished in both languages Does Bilingualism Affect Cognitive Processes and Skills? ­ Slight advantage with processing speed ­ Develop control over processes earlier ­ Advantages in cognitive tasks What Factors Influence the Acquisition of a Second Language? ­ Individuals learn their native language first and then learn a second language later ­ Language learning unfolds more effectively when initiated prior to age 7, through 15 ­ Acculturation – to the degree to which a person is socially a psychologically integrated into a new  culture Can Animals Develop Language? ­ Dolphins, sea lions, parrots, chimpanzees ­ Vocal apparatus issue ­ American Sign Language ­ Allen and Beatrice Gardner (1969) Chimpanzee – Washoe ­ 160 word vocabulary ­ Sue Savage­Rumbaugh Bonobo chimpanzee – Kanzi ­ Symbols ­ Receptive language – 72% of 660 requests ­ PET scans map brain activity in communicating chimps that resembles broca’s area in humans Language in an Evolutionary Context ­ All human societies depend on complex languages that are just as complicated as those used in  modern societies ­ Human’s special talent for language is a specific­species trait that is the product of natural  selection Theories of Language Acquisition Behaviorist   ­ Skinner  ­ Learning of specific verbal responses ­ Reinforcement and rewards ­ Vocalizations that are not reinforced gradually decline in frequency. Remaining ones are shaped  with reinforces until they are correct Nativist ­ Chomsky ­ Learning the rules of language ­ Humans have an inborn or native prosperity to language ­ Unreasonable to think children learn language by imagination ­ Language Acquisition Device (LAD): innate mechanism or process that facilitates the learning of  language Interactionist  ­ Cognitive, social communication, and emergentist theories ­ LAD is vague ­ Bio and experience ­ Social communication theories emphasize the functional value of interpersonal communication  and the social context which langua
More Less

Related notes for PS102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit