Textbook Notes (368,122)
Canada (161,660)
Psychology (1,957)
PS102 (318)
Chapter 10

Chapter 10 Lecture and Textbook Notes

8 Pages
84 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS102
Professor
Kathy Foxall
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 10: Motivation and Emotion Motivational Theories and Concepts • Motivation involves goal­directed behaivour • All theorists agree that humans display enormous diversity of motives Instinct Theory • In the early 1900’s, William McDougall proposed that humans were driven by a  variety of instincts.  • There is a serious flaw with instinct theory Drive Theory • When an organism is deprived of something it needs or wants it acts to attain  homeostasis. • Biological needs “drive” an organism to act. • Internal state of tension that motivates an organism to engage in activities that  should reduce this tension • Influential and continues to be widely used in modern psychology • Cannot explain all of motivation Arousal Theory • People seek optimal level of arousal; varies with activity and personality Incentive Theory  Motivated by external rewards  Emphasize how external stimuli pull people in certain directions  Expectancy­value models of motivation are incentive theories that take this reality  into account  Particular course of action will depend on 2 factors: expectancy about ones  chances attaining incentive and value of desired incentive Evolutionary Theory • Hold that natural selection favors behaviours that maximize reproductive • Human motives and those of other species are the product of evolution, just an  anatomical characteristics are • Evolutionary analyses of motivation are based on premise that motives can be  best understood in terms of adaptive problems they solves for our hunter­gatherer  ancestors  The Motivation of Hunger and Eating: Biological Factors • In the early 1900s, Cannon & Washburn hypothesized that there is an association  between stomach contractions and the experience of hunger. • Research in the 40s and 50s showed that the hypothalamus is important in hunger.  • Association between stomach contractions and hunger (causal) Brain Regulation • Experience is controlled by brain • Lateral hypothalamus and ventromedial nucleus of hypothalamus are on and off  switches • Arcuate nucleus and paraventrical nucleus play larger role in modulation of  hunger The Motivation of Hunger and Eating: Biological Factors Glucose and digestive regulation – Glucostatic theory – Higher glucose = less hungry – Brain keeps track of fluctuations of glucose – Thought that this is part of the regulation of hunger – Simple sugar is important source of energy Hormonal regulation – Insulin and leptin – Insulin makes use of glucose – Seeing and smelling food can release glucose – Leptin = feel full – Produced by fat cells and released into blood – After going without food for a while, stomach secretes ghrelin  which causes stomach contractions and promotes hunger The Motivation of Hunger and Eating: Environmental Factors  Learned preferences and habits – Exposure – When, as well as what – Cultures – Sweet tastes presented at birth – Unlearned salt preference emerges after 4 months – Classical conditioning  Food­related cues – Appearance, odor, effort required  – Palatability: better food tastes, more of it will be consumed – Quantity available – Variety – Presence of others  Stress  – Link between heightened arousal/negative emotion and overeating Eating and Weight: The Roots of Obesity  Evolutionary explanations  Based on BMI (>30)  Genetic predisposition  The concept of set point/settling point  Adoptees resemble biological parents, not adoptive  Twin studies  The concept of set point – fat cell levels  Dietary restraint Anorexia • 1% of adolescent & young females • Less than 85% or normal minimum weight • Restricting and binging­purging type • 10% of anorexics are male Bulimia  Normal or near normal weight  Recurrent episodes of binge eating   Recurrent inappropriate compensatory behaviours to prevent weight gain   Above behaviours occur at least twice a week for three months   Self­evaluation unduly influenced by body shape/weight Excessive Eating and Inadequate Exercise • Bottom line for overweight people is that their energy intake from food  consumption chronically exceeds their energy expenditure from physical activities  and resting metabolic processes Sensitivity to External Cues • Schachter advanced externality hypothesis that obsess people are extra sensitive  to external cues that affect hunger and are relatively insensitive to physiological  signals Concept of Set Point • Set point theory says body monitors fat cell levels to keep them fairly stable • Setting point theory proposes that weight tends to drift around the level at which  constellation of factors that determine food consumption and energy expenditure  achieves and equilibrium Dietary Restraint • Chronic dieters are restrained eaters • Tend to prepare for diets by overeating Human Sexual Response • Sexual response cycle is
More Less

Related notes for PS102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit