Textbook Notes (369,036)
Canada (162,360)
Psychology (1,978)
PS261 (109)
Chapter 2

Ch.2 intro to learning (1).docx

6 Pages
113 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS261
Professor
Anneke Olthof
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 2: Elicited Behaviour, Habituation and Sensitization 10/03/2013 Elicited behavior­ behavior that occurs in reaction to specific environmental  stimuli. Elicited responses range from simple reflexes to more complex behavior sequences and complex emotional  responses and goal­directed behavior. They are responses involved in the coordination of habituation and  sensitization. Learning is most successful if it takes into account the preexisting behavior structures of the  organism. All animals react to events in their environment. A reflex involves two closely related events : an eliciting  stimulus and a corresponding response. Presentation of the stimulus is followed by a response and the  response rarely occurs in the absence of a stimulus. Sensory neuron (afferent): transmits the sensory message to the spinal cord. Neural impulses are relayed  to the motor neuron (efferent) which activates muscles involved in the reflex response. The impulses from  one to the other are relayed through at least one interneuron.  All together they consist of the  reflex arc. Most reflexes contribute to the wellbeing of the organism. They are the behavioral repertoire for infants.  Respiratory occlusion reflex is necessary for survival. If baby does not receive air it will suffocate. (p.35  more details). Response sequences  that are typical of a specific species are referred to as modal action patterns  (MAPs). The threshold for the eliciting such activities varies. Same stimulus can have widely different  effects depending on physiological state of the animal and its recent actions. Species­specific actions  patterns aka fixed action patterns that emphasize that the activities occurred pretty much the same way in  all members of a species. But now seen as MAPS. The specific features that are found to be required to elicit pecking behavior are  called  sign stimulus or releasing stimulus . An exaggerated sign stimulus is a supernormal  stimulus. Traumatic events elicit strong defensive modal action patterns (PTSD, eye blink reflex and startle  response are examples).  Sign stimulus and supernormal stimuli have a major role in social and sexual  behavior.  Responses do not occur in isolation of one another but organized by individual actions into effective  behavior sequences. All motivated behavior involves systematically organized  sequences of actions.   Early components  of behavior sequence called appetitive behavior and  end components  are called consummatory behavior (consummation of species response sequence).   Consummatory responses are highly stereotyped species behaviors that have specific eliciting or releasing  stimuli. Appetitive behaviors are less stereotyped and can take a variety of forms.   i.e. people of different cultures have different ways of preparing food (appetitive) but chew and swallow  same way (consummatory). How animals obtain food: General search mode  ▯ focal search mode  ▯ food handling  and ingestion mode. General search occur when the subject does not know where to look for food. General responses are not  spatially localized while focal search is.  The decline in responding that occurs with repeated presentation of a stimulus is called a habituation  effect. VERY PROMINENT FEATURE IN ALL SPECIES AND SITUATIONS.  Habituation  is stimulus­specific.  Visual cues elicit a looking response (p.42). Visual attention paradigm  is a good tool in the study of infant  perceptions and a complex form of cognition. If someone unexpectedly blows a horn behind your back you are likely to jump. This is a startle  response. This consists of sudden jump and tensing of muscles of upper part of the body, and blinking  of eyes. It can be measured by placing subject on a surface that measures of sudden move
More Less

Related notes for PS261

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit