Textbook Notes (368,802)
Canada (162,170)
Psychology (1,978)
PS263 (145)
Chapter

Biopsych Week 1.docx

14 Pages
62 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS263
Professor
Bruce Mc Kay
Semester
Fall

Description
Week 1 09/13/2013 Hard Problem: Given the universe composed of matter and energy, why is there such thing as consciousness? Mind­brain Problem: What is the relationship between the mental experience and brain activity? Biological Psychology: physiological, evolutionary and developmental mechanisms of behaviour and experience ­ goal is to relate biology to issues of psychology Neuroscience: much is relevant to behaviour but also includes more detail about anatomy and chemistry  Neurons: receive info and transmit it to other cells. Brain composed of individual cells Glia: generally smaller, have many functions, BUT do not convey info over great distances  #1: Physiological Explanation ­ Relates to behaviour to the activity of the brain and other organs ­ Deals with machinery of body ­ Ex. Chemical reactions that enable hormones to influence brain activity and routes by which brain activity controls  muscles #2: Ontogenetic Explanation ­ Comes from Greek word meaning “origin” ­ How a structure or behaviour develops, including influences of genes, nutrition, experiences and other interactions ­ Ex. Ability to inhibit impulses develops gradually from infancy through teenage years reflecting gradual maturation of  frontal parts of the brain #3: Evolutionary Explanation ­ Reconstructs the evolutionary history of a structure or behaviour ­ Characteristic features of an animal are almost always modifications of something found in ancestral species ­ Ex. Monkeys use tools occasionally ­> humans evolved elaborations that enable us to use tools even better #4: Functional Explanation ­ Why a structure or behaviour evolved as it did ­ Small isolated population, gene can spread by accident through genetic drift Nerve Cells  Wednesday, September 11, 2013 The Cells of the Nervous System  Cajal – one of two main founders of Neuroscience ­ His research demonstrated that nerve cells remain separate instead of merging into one another The Structures of an Animal Cell ­ Membrane: surface of the cell, structure that separates the inside of the cell from the outside environment  it is composed of two layers of fat molecules that are free to flow around one another most chemicals cannot cross the membrane, but specific protein channels in the membrane permit a controlled flow of water,  oxygen, sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride etc.  ­ Nucleus: structure that contains chromosomes  all animal cells have this, with exclusion to mammalian red blood cells ­ Mitochondrion: structure that performs metabolic activities, providing the energy that the cell requires for all other activities  require fuel and oxygen to function ­ Ribosomes: sites the cell synthesizes new protein molecules  proteins provide building materials for the cell and facilitate various chemical reactions  some attracted to the endoplasmic reticulum: a network of thin tubes that transport newly synthesized proteins to other locations  The Structure of a Neuron ­ most distinctive is their shape, which varies from one to another ­ branching extensions ­ larger neurons: dendrites, a soma (cell body), and axon, and presynaptic terminals (the tiniest neurons lack axons, and some  well­defined dendrites) Nerve Cells  Wednesday, September 11, 2013 ­ Motor Neuron: soma in the spinal cord, receives excitation from other neurons through its dendrites and conducts impulses  along its axon to a muscle  ­ Sensory Neuron: specialized at one end to be highly sensitive to a particular type of stimulation, such as light, sound or touch  ­ Dendrites: branching fibers that get narrower near their ends (comes from Greek word meaning “tree”) surface is lined with specialized synaptic receptors, where the dendrite receives info from other neurons  the greater surface area, the more info it can receive (branch widely) Dendritic spines: short outgrowths that increase the surface area available for synapses  ­ Cell body/Soma: contains the nucleus, ribosomes, and mitochondria  most of metabolic work of neuron occurs here  range in diameters 0.005 mm to 0.1 mm in mammals and up to full millimeter in certain invertebrates  covered with synapses on its surface in many neurons  ­ Axon: thin fiber of constant diameter, in most cases longer than the dendrites  term comes from Greek word meaning “axis”  neurons info sender, conveying an impulse toward other neurons or organ or muscle  Myelin Sheath: insulating material  Nodes of Ranvier: interruptions in the myelin sheath  Presynaptic Terminal: swells at the tips of the branches of the axon (end bulb or bouton) point where axon releases chemicals that cross through the junction between one neuron to the next  ­ neuron can have any number of dendrites ­ only one axon, but that axon may have branches far from the soma  ­ axons can be a meter in length (spinal cord to feet)  ­ the size of it is like a narrow highway that stretches across a continent  Nerve Cells  Wednesday, September 11, 2013 ­ Afferent Axon: brings infinto  structure (sensory neuron) (A = admit) ­ Efferent Axon: carries infaway  from structure (motor neuron) (E = exit)  ­ Interneuron/Intrinsic Neuron: when a cell’s dendrites and axon are entirely contained within a single structure  ­ shape of a given neuron determines its connections with other neurons and thereby determines its contribution to the nervous  system  ­ wider branches = more targets  Glia ­ perform many functions (not transmitting info though) ­ from Greek word meaning “glue” – reflects early investigators idea that glia are like glue that held neurons together  ­ smaller, but more numerous than neurons  ­ Astrotypes: star­shaped, help synchronize the activity of the axons, enabling them to send messages in waves  remove waste material created when neurons die and control the amount of blood flow to each brain area  ­ Neurons communicate by releasing certain transmitters, such as glutamate, after neurons release this, nearby glia cells absorb  some of the access  glia convert most of this glutamate into glutamine and then pass it back to the neurons which convert it back to glutamate which  they get ready for further release  ­ Microglia: very small cells, remove waste material as well as viruses, fungi and other microorganisms – function as part of the  immune system  ­ Oligodendrocytes: build the myelin sheaths that surround and insulate certain vertebrate axons  ­ Schwann Cells: glia cells that build myelin sheath  ­ Radial Glia: guide to migration of neurons and their axons and dendrites during embryonic development  when embryological development finishes, most radial glia differentiate into neurons, and a smaller number differentiate into  astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes  The Blood­Brain Barrier Nerve Cells  Wednesday, September 11, 2013 ­ Depends on the endothelial cells that form the walls of the capillaries  ­ Outside the brain, such cells are separated by small gaps, but in the brain, they are joined tightly that virtually nothing  passes between them ­ The barrier keeps out useful chemicals as well as harmful ones o Useful – fuels and amino acids, the building blocks for proteins  ­ #1 Small Charged Molecules  oxygen and carbon dioxide, cross freely water crosses through special protein channels in the wall of the endothelial cells  ­ #2 Molecules that dissolve in the fats of the membrane cross passively  Ex., vitamins A and D and all drugs that affect the brain  ­ Active Transport: brain uses protein­mediated process that expends energy to pump chemicals from the blood into the brain  ­ Chemicals that are actively transported into the brain include: o Glucose (brains main fuel) o Amino acids (building blocks of proteins) o Purines o Choline o Few vitamins o Iron o Certain hormones ­ essential to health ­ Example: Alzheimer’s disease or similar conditions, the endothelial cells lining the brains blood vessels shrink, and harmful  chemicals ever the brain  Nerve Cells  Wednesday, September 11, 2013 ­ also poses difficulty in medicine because it keeps out many medications Vertebrate Neurons  ­ Depend entirely on glucose, a sugar ­ because the metabolic pathway that uses glucose requires oxygen, neurons need a steady supply of oxygen  ­ Glucose is practically the only nutrient that crosses the blood­brain barrier after infancy, except for ketones (a kind of fat) ­ Glucose shortage is rarely a problem  ­ liver makes glucose from many kinds of carbohydrates and amino acids ­ Only likely problem is an inabilituseo glucose  to use glucose the body needs vitamin B1, thiamine prolonged thiamine deficiency, common in chronic alcoholism, leads to death of neurons and a condition  Week 1   Friday, September 13, 2013 The Resting Potential of the Neuron ­ All parts of a neuron are covered by a membrane about 8 nanometers thick ­ Composed of two layers of phospholipid molecules (containing chains of fatty acids and a phosphate group) ­ embedded among phospholipids are cylindrical protein molecules ­ chemicals can pass ­ Structure of membrane – flexibility and firmness and controls flow of chemicals between the inside and outside of cell ­ When there is no outside disturbance, electrical gradient/polarization: a difference in electrical charge between the inside and outside of the  cell neuron inside – slightly negative electrical potential compared to outside (negatively charged proteins inside the cell) ­ Resting Potential: its stable, negative charge when the cell is inactive, difference in voltage in a resting neuron (RESTING VOLTAGE) researchers measure by inserting a very thin microelectrode into the cell body  must be as small as possible so it does not cause damage most common electrode is a fine glass tube filled with a concentrated salt solution and tapering to a tip diameter of 0.0005 mm or less  Membrane is selectively permeable: some chemicals pass through it more freely than others Biologically important ions: ­ Sodium ­ Potassium ­ Calcium ­ Chloride  ▯ cross through membrane channels or gates that are sometimes open or closed Week 1  
More Less

Related notes for PS263

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit