Textbook Notes (367,866)
Canada (161,461)
Psychology (1,951)
PS285 (38)
Chapter 14

Health Psychology – Chapter 14 notes.docx

4 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS285
Professor
Eric Theriault
Semester
Winter

Description
Health Psychology – Chapter 14: Health Literacy ­ one way to influence health­related behaviour ­ dissemination of health information through communication has been one of the  most prominent approachs to health promotion over the past decades  ­ to promote health, individuals should be provided with sufficient information that  will encourage them to make ‘healthy’ choices and to modify certain behaviours  that are considered ‘hazardous.’  ­ this approach to health promotion acknowledges the relevance of human agency,  autonomy and personal choice in determining one’s health status and treats  individuals as active processors of data rather than passive responders to  environmental stimuli.  ­ Social Cognition Model: designed by psychologists who argue that knowledge,  perceived social norms, beliefs, attitudes and self­efficacy are associated with  behavioural intentions and behaviour itself. (ALL CHAPTER 6 MODELS  (HBM)) ­ Interventions that have relied primarily on health information dissemination have  often FAILED to achieve sustainable behaviour change and have made little  impact in helping to narrow the gap in social and economic inequalities in health.  ­ Just because individuals are given information about health doesn’t mean that  they will simply adopt the information given, understand it, or even read it in the  first place o Information dissemination is not enough as far as health promotion is  concerened because it is based on the assumption that knowledge alone is  sufficient to influence health­related behaviours and health outcomes.  o It assumes that individuals have equal access to information and that the  information disseminated is at a level understood by its intended  recipients.  o Assumes that knowledge can lead to attitude change, can lead to  behavioural intentions, which then can lead to behaviour change itself.  o These assumptions are still unsupported ­ It is worth considering whether: 1) the INFORMATION reaches and is  understood by its intended recipients; 2) the RECIPIENTS have the necessary  skills to adopt the information; and 3) the ENVIORNMENTAL and  STRUCTURAL conditions are supportive of the behaviours advocated. THIS is  where health literacy comes in.  ­ Early definitions of health literacy focused on the application of cognitive skills  such as reading and numeracy skills to understand and use information to function  in the health­care setting.  ­ Later, definitions expanded the concept to include social skills, and applying these  skills to include one’s ability to access information to promote and maintain  health. More RECENT definitions are incorporating ideas from health promotion  and empowerment to include evaluation and communication skills that can enable  individuals to improve their health by making informed decisions, increasing  control and taking responsibility for health in various contexts.  ­ THREE LEVELS of health literacy (NUTBEAM, 2000) o Level 1: Functional Health Literacy  ▯refers to the basic reading and  writing skills that can help individuals to function effectively in the health­ care context. Directed towards improving knowledge  o Level 2: Interactive Health Literacy  ▯refers to the development of  personal skills in a supportive environment to improve personal capacity  to enable individuals to act independently based on knowledge. Improving  motivation and self­confidence to act on the advice received  o Level 3: Critical Health Literacy  ▯refers to the ability to critically evaluate   and use information to actively participate in health promotion.  ­ Zarcadoolas, Pleasant and Greer (2005) proposed a multidimensional framework  for understanding health literacy which organized the concept into four central  domains:  o Domain 1: Fundamental Literacy  ▯refers to reading, writing, speaking and   numeracy skills o Domain 2: Scientific Literacy  ▯refers to competence with fundamental  scientific concepts, comprehension of technological complexity, scientific  uncertainty, and an understanding that rapid change in the accepted  science is possible o Domain 2: Civic Literacy  ▯refers to skills that enable people to become  aware of public issues and to become involved in the decision­making  process  o Domain 4: Cultural Literacy  ▯refers to the ability to recognize and use  collective beliefs, customs, worldview and social identity in order to  interpret and act on health information  ­ Two of the most commonly used tools to assess health literacy levels of patients  in clinical practice that are the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine &  the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults.  ­ Health Promotion  ▯the process of enabling people to increase control over, and to   improve, their health.  ­ DeWalt, Berkman, Sheridan, Lohr and Pignone (2004) showed that patients with  low literacy tend to have poorer health outcomes, including knowledge, 
More Less

Related notes for PS285

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit