SY101 Chapter Notes - Chapter 4: Organized Crime, English Canadian, Technological Determinism

116 views6 pages
20 Apr 2018
School
Department
Course
CHAPTER 4: CULTURE
What is Culture?
- The language, beliefs, values, norms, behaviors, and even material objects that are
passed from one generation to the next
Cultural Differences
- There is nothing natural about culture
o ulture ithi
learned and shared ways of believing and of doing becomes core and are
part of our taken-for-granted assumptions of concerning normal
behaviors
becomes the lens through which we perceive and evaluate what is going
on around us
only when it is challenged do we recognize
Symbolic Culture
- “oe soiologists refer to oaterial ulture as soli ulture eause oe of it’s
central concept is the symbols people use to communicate
- Symbol: anything people attach meaning and then use to communicate
- Culture and taken-for-granted orientations to life
o Assues our ulture, eliefs, laguage, gestures et. are oral
o Culture Withi Us -- We came into life without values, morality, and no real
ideas about what is going on in the world but we all have them at this part in our
lives
Culture becomes the lens in which we see the world
o Cultural Shock
Nonmaterial culture fails to make sense of your surroundings
disconnection you experience
o Ethnocentrism
Tendency to use your own groups ways of doing things as a yardstick for
judging others
Positive outcome creates in-group loyalties
Negative outcome leads to harmful discrimination
o Cultural Relativism
Trying to understand a culture on its own terms
An attempt to refocus our cultural lens and appreciate other ways of life
Roert Edgerto eliees soe ultures edager their people’s ealth,
happiness or survival and that we should make a scale to evaluate
cultures on their quality of life; some cultural values are exploitive and
inferior
- Gestures
o Use of oe’s od laguage to ouiate ith others, are useful shorthad
ways of giving messages without using words
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-2 of the document.
Unlock all 6 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
o Meanings may change according to culture
o Facilitate communication but can also be misleading or lead to interpersonal
conflict
o Important to learn other cultural gestures
- Language
o A system of symbols that can be strung together in an infinite number of ways
for the purpose of communicating abstract thoughts
o Universal in the sense that all human groups possess it, but there is nothing
universal about the meaning given to particular sounds
o Some sounds may mean different things in different cultures
o Allows human experience to be cumulative
o Provides a social or shared past and future
o Allows complex, shared, goal-directed behavior
o Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
Hopi Indians had no way of distinguishing between past, present and
future
Concluded that language is embedded with ways of looking at the world
When we learn language, we not only learn words, but a certain way of
thinking
Alerts us how much we are affected by language
Reverses common sense
Noam Chomsky argues that the human brain contains a common
structural basis bade up of a limited set of rules for organizing language
Fact that people can learn foreign languages and that words and
ideas can be made of from one language to another supports
Chosk’s idea that all huas hae siilar liguisti ailities ad
thought processes
Cultural Differences
- Ethnocentrism
o Tendency to judge other groups ways of doing things by our own
In group loyalties vs. discrimination
- Cultural Relativism
o Trying to understand a culture on its own terms
o This notion of appreciating a different culture for its history and presence has
come under criticism
- Anthro Robert Edgeston Sick Societies
o Judge  their people’s happiess, health, surial, eleets of eploitatio
Symbolic Culture
- Values, Norms and Sanctions
o Values: what is desirable, by which they define good/bad, beautiful/ugly
o Norms: grow out of/reflect values through social expectations or rules of
behavior
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-2 of the document.
Unlock all 6 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

The language, beliefs, values, norms, behaviors, and even material objects that are passed from one generation to the next. O(cid:373)e so(cid:272)iologists refer to (cid:374)o(cid:374)(cid:373)aterial (cid:272)ulture as s(cid:455)(cid:373)(cid:271)oli(cid:272) (cid:272)ulture (cid:271)e(cid:272)ause o(cid:374)e of it"s central concept is the symbols people use to communicate. Symbol: anything people attach meaning and then use to communicate. Cho(cid:373)sk(cid:455)"s idea that all hu(cid:373)a(cid:374)s ha(cid:448)e si(cid:373)ilar li(cid:374)guisti(cid:272) a(cid:271)ilities a(cid:374)d thought processes. Ethnocentrism: tendency to judge other groups ways of doing things by our own. Cultural relativism: trying to understand a culture on its own terms, this notion of appreciating a different culture for its history and presence has come under criticism. Anthro robert edgeston sick societies: judge (cid:271)(cid:455) their people"s happi(cid:374)ess, health, sur(cid:448)i(cid:448)al, ele(cid:373)e(cid:374)ts of e(cid:454)ploitatio(cid:374) Folkways and mores: folkways: norms that are not strictly enforced, mores: core to our values and demand conformity, one groups folkways could be another groups mores. Taboo: a norm that is so strongly engrained that violations is greeted with revulsion.

Get access

Grade+
$10 USD/m
Billed $120 USD annually
Homework Help
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
40 Verified Answers
Study Guides
Booster Classes
Class+
$8 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Homework Help
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
30 Verified Answers
Study Guides
Booster Classes