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Ch11_Sect01

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Administrative Studies
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ADMS 2320
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CHAPTER 11 SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION TO HYPOTHESIS TESTING MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. The probability of a Type I error is denoted by: a. β b. 1 − β c. α d. 1 − α ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 2. A Type I error is committed if we make: a. a correct decision when the null hypothesis is false. b. a correct decision when the null hypothesis is true. c. an incorrect decision when the null hypothesis is false. d. an incorrect decision when the null hypothesis is true. ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 3. A Type II error is committed if we make: a. a correct decision when the null hypothesis is false. b. a correct decision when the null hypothesis is true. c. an incorrect decision when the null hypothesis is false. d. an incorrect decision when the null hypothesis is true. ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 4. A professor of statistics refutes the claim that the average student spends 3 hours studying for the midterm exam. She thinks they spend more time than that. Which hypotheses are used to test the claim? a. H 0 μ ≠ 3 vs. H 1 μ > 3 b. H :0μ = 3 vs. H :1μ ≠ 3 c. H : μ ≠ 3 vs. H : μ = 3 0 1 d. H 0 μ = 3 vs. H 1 μ < 3 ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 5. The hypothesis of most interest to the researcher is: a. the alternative hypothesis. b. the null hypothesis. c. both hypotheses are of equal interest. d. Neither hypothesis is of interest. ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 6. A spouse suspects that the average amount of money spent on Christmas gifts for immediate family members is above $1,200. The correct set of hypotheses is: a. H 0 μ = 1200 vs. H 1 μ < 1200 b. H 0 μ > 1200 vs. H 1 μ = 1200 c. H 0 μ = 1200 vs. H 1 μ > 1200 d. H 0 μ < 1200 vs. H 1 μ = 1200 This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 7. Which of the following conclusions is not an appropriate conclusion from a hypothesis test? a. Reject H 0 Sufficient evidence to support 1 . b. Fail to reject 0 . Insufficient evidence to suppo1t H . c. Accept H .0Sufficient evidence to support H0. d. All of these choices are true. ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 8. A Type I error occurs when we: a. reject a false null hypothesis. b. reject a true null hypothesis. c. don't reject a false null hypothesis. d. don't reject a true null hypothesis. ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 9. A Type II error is defined as: a. rejecting a true null hypothesis. b. rejecting a false null hypothesis. c. not rejecting a true null hypothesis. d. not rejecting a false null hypothesis. ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 10. The probability of a Type II error is denoted by: a. α b. β c. 1 − α d. 1 − β ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 11. In a criminal trial, a Type I error is made when: a. a guilty defendant is acquitted. b. an innocent person is convicted. c. a guilty defendant is convicted. d. an innocent person is acquitted. ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 12. In a criminal trial, a Type II error is made when: a. a guilty defendant is acquitted. b. an innocent person is convicted. c. a guilty defendant is convicted. d. an innocent person is acquitted. ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 13. We cannot commit a Type I error when the: a. null hypothesis is true. b. level of significance is 0.10. c. null hypothesis is false. d. test is a two-tail test. This edition is intended fcopied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher.t from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 14. The level of significance can be: a. any number between −1.0 and 1.0. b. any number greater than zero. c. any number greater than 1.96 or less than −1.96. d. None of these choices. ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 15. Which of the following is an appropriate null hypothesis? a. The mean of a population is equal to 60. b. The mean of a sample is equal to 60. c. The mean of a population is not equal to 60. d. All of these choices are true. ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 16. Which of the following statements is not true? a. The probability of making a Type II error increases as the probability of making a Type I error decreases. b. The probability of making a Type II error and the level of significance are the same. c. The power of the test decreases as the level of significance decreases. d. All of these choices are true. ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 17. Which of the following would be an appropriate alternative hypothesis? a. The mean of a population is equal to 70. b. The mean of a sample is equal to 70. c. The mean of a population is greater than 70. d. The mean of a sample is greater than 70. ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 18. If a test of hypothesis has a Type I error probability of .05, this means that: a. if the null hypothesis is true, we don't reject if 5% of the time. b. if the null hypothesis is true, we reject it 5% of the time. c. if the null hypothesis is false, we don't reject it 5% of the time. d. if the null hypothesis is false, we reject it 5% of the time. ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 19. Suppose we wish to test H : μ = 45 vs. H : μ > 45. What will result if we conclude that the mean is 0 1 greater than 45 when the actual mean is 50? a. We have made a Type I error. b. We have made a Type II error. c. We have made both a Type I error and a Type II error. d. We have made the correct decision. ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 20. Which of the following probabilities is equal to the significance level α? a. Probability of making a Type I error. b. Probability of making a Type II error. This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. c. Probability of rejecting H 0hen you are supposed to. d. Probability of not rejecting H when you shouldn't. 0 ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 21. If we reject the null hypothesis when it is false, then we have committed: a. a Type II error. b. a Type I error. c. both a Type I error and a Type II error. d. neither a Type I error nor a Type II error. ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 22. Researchers claim that 60 tissues is the average number of tissues a person uses during the course of a cold. The company who makes Kleenex brand tissues thinks that fewer of their tissues are needed. What are their null and alternative hypotheses? a. H 0 μ = 60 vs. H1: μ > 60 b. H : μ = 60 vs. H : μ < 60 0 1 c. H 0 = 60 vs. H1: < 60 d. H : μ < 60 vs. H : μ = 60 0 1 ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 23. The owner of a local nightclub has recently surveyed a random sample of n = 300 customers of the club. She would now like to determine whether or not the mean age of her customers is over 35. If so, she plans to alter the entertainment to appeal to an older crowd. If not, no entertainment changes will be made. The appropriate hypotheses to test are: a. H 0 μ = 35 vs. H1: μ < 35. b. H : μ = 35 vs. H : μ > 35. 0 1 c. H 0 = 35 vs. H1: < 35. d. H : = 35 vs. H : > 35. 0 1 ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 TRUE/FALSE 24. An alternative or research hypothesis is an assertion that holds if the null hypothesis is false. ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 25. A Type I error is represented by β. ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 26. A null hypothesis is a statement about the value of a population parameter. ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 27. A Type II error is represented by α; it is the probability of rejecting a true null hypothesis. ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 This edition is intended for use outside of the U.S. only, with content that may be different from the U.S. Edition. This may not be resold, copied, or distributed without the prior consent of the publisher. 28. Reducing the probability of a Type I error also reduces the probability of a Type II error. ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 29. Increasing the probability of a Type I error will increase the probability of a Type II error. ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 30. It is possible to commit a Type I error and a Type II error at the same time. ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 31. A Type I error is represented by α; it is the probability of rejecting a true null hypothesis. ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 32. In a criminal trial, a Type I error is made when an innocent person is convicted. ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 33. The probability of making a Type I error and the level of significance are the same. ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 34. In a criminal trial, a Type II error is made when an innocent person is acquitted. ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: SECTION 11.1 35. There is an inverse relationship between the probabilities of Type I and Type II errors; as one increases, the other decreases, and vice versa.
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