Textbook Notes (367,747)
Canada (161,363)
York University (12,778)
COMN 1000 (38)
Chapter 15

Chapter 15 of Shade.docx

4 Pages
129 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication Studies
Course
COMN 1000
Professor
Nick Skinner
Semester
Winter

Description
Aylen, Ranjana, Tashara Chapter 15 of Shade: Privacy in a Networked Environment Introduction  Networked communication technologies allow bureaucrats, employers, spouses, insurance  companies, marketers and researchers to access and record all personal information such  as commercial transactions, travel arrangements, academic grades, health information,  financial records and personal preferences. However, this information is utilized in ways  to develop and flourish their companies in regards to the capitalist economy.    The use of technology leads to the collection of shared communication – chatting with  friends, working, playing ­ and can be easily used against them to determine their profile.  • E.G Google & Facebook  Individuals are even being profiled when driving around or walking down the streets of  the city • E.G Advertisers and Street Cameras  The advantages of this kind of surveillance are that it increases security, reduces crime,  cuts costs and provides the economy the necessary information  However, there are a number of disadvantages such as criminalizing innocent citizens  Companies also collect details of individuals purchasing preferences, exchanges, refunds  and offer discounts and special offers by promoting preferred­shopper cards. However,  this information can be used for secondary purposes and can be revealed to advertisers or  used to the companies best interest that may lead to embarrassment, humiliation,  manipulation  Definitions of privacy  There are a variety of definitions on privacy  1890, Samuel Warren and Louis Brandeis were worried that new technologies challenged  the current social boundaries and promoted the commercial value of information. They  believed strongly that commerce should not overrun the right to privacy  House of commons Standing Committee on Human Rights and the Status of Persons with  Disabilities agreed that it is a right to enjoy your privacy, be free from surveillance and  control your own personal information  Therefore, privacy was broken up into 4 different ways: 1.  Privacy as a human right;  2.  Privacy as an essential part of the democratic process;  3.  Privacy as a social value  4.  Privacy as data protection . 1. Privacy as a human right  1948,  Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed that no one ‘shall be subjected  to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence”  The United Nations’ also believed that “all members of the human family is the  foundation of freedom, justice, and peace in the world”  Canada was a leader in establishing privacy as a fundamental human right  However, these rights were not executed in the best manner as there were a number of  limitations in terms of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, as it does not  include an express right to privacy and it is sufficient enough with the development of  new technologies  Aylen, Ranjana, Tashara  Section 8 of the Charter protects everyone from unreasonable search/seizure and includes  that individuals have ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’  • E.g . It is unreasonable to videotape what happens in a private hotel room but it is  reasonable for the police to videotape crude behaviors in a public washroom.   New technologies allow others to intercept in our communications, as open  communication networks allow any user to seize and read unencrypted communication of  any other user.  • Internet doesn’t necessarily have any reasonable expectations of privacy, as the  technology gives no expectation of privacy. • Difficult to find privacy in public spaces due to the monitored security cameras  and GPS­enabled smart phones – that also allow us to share our location with the  public through apps  Section 8 of the Charter seeks to protect any information that can reveal personal  information of an individuals lifestyle and personal choices  This matter is usually breached due to technology  Data­matching software plays a large role as it can locate and connect personal details ­  such as our shopping behaviors, our social profiles on the internet, and our financial  record – and creates a profile of our private lives  This information is also exploited by marketers and can be accessible to many.   This info can be even misleading or false, but it is argued that these technologies inhibit  crime and terrorism.   Privacy is an essential part of human dignity and autonomy 2. Privacy as a Democratic Value  Governments can easily pry into the lives of the citizens  Western governments accept that privacy is an important democratic value  Authoritarian states such as North Korea and China use technology to challenge  political objectors. They point out that placing video cameras on street corners – that  scan, record and identify faces – make it less likely for individuals to rebel against  political rulings, even though it is the publics right to practice their freedom of speech.  Communication technologies provide the government with vast amounts of  information about citizens; as they can look for patterns and determine who is a  supposed ‘risk’ • Certain lifestyle changes or difficulties indicate the individuals that likely of  committing acts of violence. However, this profiling leads to problems as it puts  inn
More Less

Related notes for COMN 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit