Textbook Notes (369,140)
Canada (162,411)
York University (12,903)
CRIM 1650 (18)
Chapter

Racialization of crime

2 Pages
291 Views

Department
Criminology
Course Code
CRIM 1650
Professor
James Williams

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Description
Racialization of crime: the process through which crime is constructed or defined in explicitly racial terms. Symbolic racism is involved in process if racialization of crime. Groups of people are negatively represented through coded language and symbols producing race based accounts of common social problems. E.G. Strain theory leads to it and structural Functions. (Blaming the individual) Criminalization of Race: the treatment of particular radicalized groups as though they are potentially criminals. E.G. Racial profiling and systemic racism; Strain theory leads to it and structural Functions (Mexicans and marijuana are one and the same; blamed them for having marijuana) Racial Hoax: Myth of `Criminal Blackman` Susan smith = she said because we know all know that black men carjack she said; her car was carjacked by black males and kidnapped her children and was left on the street. She gave a description of the black men and they were the same as all black me; and they believed her right away; turns out she had murdered her children and sunk the car, yet the police arrested everyone, even without a criminal record. Systemic Racism: the processes of intuitions and about the effects of consequences and implications of symbolic racism. E.G. racial profiling and eligibility of bail. Such racism becomes invisible or at least deniable. Deniability is its key feature. E.G.: Police can point to a variety of different factors to justify their actions. Racial Profiling: stems from criminalization of race. Is any action undertaken for reasons of `security` and `protection` that come from st
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