Textbook Notes (368,566)
Canada (161,966)
York University (12,849)
KINE 1000 (90)
Chapter 5

Chapter 5

3 Pages
120 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology & Health Science
Course
KINE 1000
Professor
Hernan Humana
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 5 Making Chinese Canadian masculinities in Vancouver’s physical education curriculum By: Brad Millington, Patricia Vertinsky, Ellexis Boyle and Brian Wilson  Introduction • Millington saw a white kid being discriminative towards Asian kids, in PE class, as he said the Asians are at a disadvantage in  the class. • This racism occurred a century ago, in the form of “chink bashing” ▯ white boys attacked Chinese boys. • Chinese boys are presented, both past and present, as unworthy foils of young white males. This creates hierarchies of  racialized masculinities. • The broad goal is to begin to tease out the patterns of “power at play” in the interactions of race and masculinity in PE. • This is a crucial first step towards questioning and reshaping PE, which could provide a non racism setting of education. • The authors position is to get a better understanding of the connections between overt historical forms of racism and more  subtle contemporary forms of racism that could inspire a questioning of taken­for­granted strategies for designing and  implementing PE in schools. It could also help teachers working in PE to understand the complexity of masculinity and  racism. • There are indicators that the integration of visible­minority immigrants is impeded by the perception of discrimination and  vulnerability and that their children are exhibiting as profound a sense of exclusion as their parents.  • Many Canadians think racism is not present in Canada, but it is and this causes persistence of white privilege and power. Constructing Chinese­Canadian masculinities: institutional racism and the historical stereotyping of Chinese men in Western Canada th • In mid 19  century and onwards, Asians were stereotyped as small, effeminate and weak in relation to the bodies and  masculinities of white men. Also, they were thought as sexually perverse, barbaric, and their wives were symbols of  scapegoats for China’s national humility. • Chinese men were called the “sick men of East Asia”.  • They were also called the “yellow peril” ▯ Oriental Chinamen description as deceitful, morally dangerous and feminine.  • There was a fear that hoards of Chinese would overpopulate Canada and spread disease, drugs and lifestyles. So Orientals and  black people were banned from using swimming pools until 1945.  • Terms of “yellow bellied, yellow devil and yellow fiend” were used by newspapers to make people panic about the dangerous  sexuality of Chinese men, and their cowardness.  • From late 1880’s to WW1, no group faced more racism than Chinese. • There was a self­fulfilling prophecy as Vancouver Asian’s worked in laundry mats, and restaurants and lost masculinity b/c  they were perceived as doing “women’s’ work”. • There was a Act to Regulate the Chinese Population of BC ▯denied right to vote, work or own Crown Land, hire white women,   a head tax on children, etc. They could not have interracial marriages, causing them to be unmasculine.  • The enforced segregation influenced the social perception of Asians in Vancouver society.   • They weren’t allowed to bring wives over from China, so restrictions of their social roles of fathers/husband fed the white  man’s view of themselves as more superior and masculine than Asian men.  Chinese masculinities in early BC schools • Masculinity in early school setting was linked to the requirement of building and sustaining the British Empire, and the  masculine model was white military heroes.  • English language discourse constructed Chinese characters as “Asiatic population alien in spirit, feeling and everything”. • White working class were the main supporters of school segregation, and older Asian kids were segregated from other kids. • Chinese merchant class had to support hegemonic masculinity to allow their kids to get a good education. Chinese­Canadian sporting pursuits • Chinese people focused more on education. Chinese people of a higher socio­economic status were able to enrol kids in sport.  • Ex:  Rich Chinese merchant, Yip Sang, was able to enrol sons into soccer. One son, Quene Yip, was recruited by university  football teams. His teammate said team’s success came from Chinese player’s quickness and speed. • On the soccer field, the notion that race was erased in a romanticized one. It is likely that white people thought Asians were  being assimilated into Canadian society and they were gaining social and physical capital.  Chinese­Canadian masculinities in the late twentieth and early twenty­first centuries: everyday racism • Chinese people wield immense influence on every aspect of society which some claim is Canada’s multiculturalism at it’s  best ▯ a colour blind gathering of talent and shared purpose. • Asians arriving from China in 1980’s are viewed as business powerhouses.  • The global media has new images of Chinese masculinity ▯ Bruce Lee, Yao Ming inserted new images of hard bodied manhood   into Chinese masculinity notions.  • They have introduced chameleon­like properties ▯ holding up academic excellence while glorifying western ideas of discipline  in Oriental cultures.  • One of the most important stories of Asian Americans experience is the process of receiving and retelling cultural traditions in  the face of dominant ideas of Asian’s.  • The whites and Asians still tend to conduct themselves as 2 solitudes.  • Chinese Canadian’s have not been fully accepted into Canadian society. Asians are still seemed as racially distinct, culturally  exotic, interested in the pur
More Less

Related notes for KINE 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit