Textbook Notes (368,430)
Canada (161,877)
York University (12,845)
Management (143)
MGMT 1000 (14)
Jean Adams (13)
Chapter

Schulich MGMT 1000 Notes Week 7.docx

7 Pages
133 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Management
Course
MGMT 1000
Professor
Jean Adams
Semester
Fall

Description
MGMT 1000 Notes Week 7 Activity: 7.1 Cultivating Trust (NMS) Trust cannot be bought, it must be earned  There are six ways to cultivate high levels of trust: 1. Honor your commitments • Take responsibility and be honest. • Commitments don’t have to be large to make a positive impact 2. Demonstrate empathy and caring • Develop an understanding and interest in others • Making accommodations to suit others shows that you care 3. Be honest and open. Share information • Trust is hard to gain, but easy to lose; therefore be honest • Being open and sharing information builds on relationships 4. Be generous with credit where it is due • Crediting others motivates them to performing the same or better the next time • Never take another person’s credit; it breaks trust 5. Be fair • Don’t show biasness, treat everyone equitably • Don’t carry problems from one situation to another, it’s not fair to others  6. Walk the talk • Turn your words into actions • Don’t be a hypocrite ▯ it’s definitely not a leadership quality. • “Eat your own cooking” If you want someone to do something, you should do it yourself  too.  7.2 Understanding Ripple Effects of Words and Actions (NMS) As a leader, people analyze your words and actions in greater detail that regular people. It is important to  understand this and to be forewarned of potential side effects.  Targeted Advice: There are five things one can do to anticipate and manage the ripple effect of  words and actions 1.  Understand that everything you say and do as a leader is scrutinized and likely to get amplified.  • Be aware of body language, selection of words and expressions • Be aware of what other think of you and how you are portrayed 2.  Remember that what you     don't do     or     don't say     also gets amplified. Your omissions and silences ­   intended or unintended ­ can often be more powerful than what you actually say or do. • Don’t forget to credit people • Be timely with responses • Focus on the positive, don’t elaborate on negatives 3.  Think about the likely impact of your actions, words, and silences. In sensitive situations try to   anticipate negative consequences. • Show proper etiquette, don’t yawn during presentations • Don’t be misleading with announcements • Watch your tone, be aware of your consequences 4.  Find reliable "sounding boards." They can give you valuable advice on how your words, actions,   and silences are likely to be received. They can help you identify and filter negative  consequences. • Learning more about yourself improves people trust in you • Identify people you can trust • Test your skills on them and make adjustments based on their reactions  5.  Buy time in difficult or sensitive situations. Don't always be in a rush to respond or offer a   definitive opinion. • Use your time wisely. This build a clearer picture and builds decisiveness • Trust your instincts • Allow time to settle your heated emotions   9   QUICK TIPS: UNDERSTANDING THE RIPPLE EFFECT OF   WORDS AND ACTIONS 1. When you’re off record, act as if you’re on record • Never let your guard down. • As a leader your title and recognition is carried with you everywhere 2. Silence is not always golden. Speak up to avoid misunderstandings • Being clear and thorough avoids people from fabricating the truth.  3. Provide complete information if you can • Being clear and thorough avoids people from fabricating the truth.  4. Watch your body language • Your body language is an extension of your personality therefore use it wisely • Body language can contradict what you truly feel therefore use it wisely 5. Watch your dress code • As a leader, people look up to you for what you approve and disprove • Set the right example through what you choose to wear 6. Watch out for red flags of diversity • Be respectful and knowledgeable of cultures, religions and backgrounds.   • Diversity is inevitable 7. Beware unintentional or implied slights  • If you are praising an outstanding performance, be consistent with the praise to the public, and  only private reflect on flaws.  8. Make sure you empowers your advisors to be frank  • Honesty provides the best constructive criticism that benefits everyone • Don’t be defensive with tips for improvement • Don’t shoot the messenger of negative news 9.  Sometimes a difficult situation will solve itself if you give it time  • Use time wisely. Know when quick responses are needed and when they can wait.  • Using time effectively means allowing others to do their job without your unnecessary  intervention  Readings: 7.3 Tit for Tat: A Strategy for Cooperation and Survival? (e­pub) How can I win if you don’t lose? Games where the winner doesn’t take all • Anatol Rapoport, UofT professor, illuminates the falseness in believing in real life scenarios that  a winner takes all, leaving the “losers” with nothing. • He uses the Prisoner’s Dilemma. The winner of this game succeeds by sharing and never  attempting to outdo an opponent.  Instead a winner follows their opponent and only defends  themselves by immediate retaliation.  • Life involves the clashing of interests and desires and calls for the need of cooperation and  collaboration.  • Main idea: It’s better to cooperate! • The game was invented in the 1950s and since then has been growing with popularity • Specifics of the Prisoner’s Dilemma: Each prisoner is given two choices: if they keep quiet they both get a sentence of 2 years, but if  one rats he will get off free while the other serves 5 years. If bother of them rat out each other,  they both will get 4 years. The best scenario is for one prisoner is to rat out the other, while the  other remains quiet. But who can be trusted? • Tit for tat= you do not have to deprive others to succeed, do unto others as you would have them  do to you • Lesson: develop trust, don’t be selfish, the success of another can ultimately lead to your own.  o People’s interests collide and partly conflict, it’s better to negotiate than stay stubborn  and not cooperate, cooperation leads to better outcomes for both players  7.4Hooked on Work (e­pub) • Workaholism is socially acceptable for its social productivity even though it is deadly  ▯Bonuses,  benefits and perks can spur this “disease” • Addictions to work can be related to actual job responsibilities and the organization • Organizations lure work addicts through promises kept to employees time after time. Promises  can include fitting in, money, power, influence and certain social titles.  • The good life­ power, influence and money­ are common to both organizational and social  motivators • Organizations use future outlook­ the potential for future greatness­ to lure people into devoting  their time and efforts. The best targets seem to be employees from dysfunctional homes, and little  obligations to family.  • When a person is addicted to work, the organization is their family. The family controls an  employee’s life and actions. Acceptance is very important, and employees do whatever it takes to  fit in.  • Addicts are con artists that can eventually start to b
More Less

Related notes for MGMT 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit