Textbook Notes (368,799)
Canada (162,168)
York University (12,867)
NATS 1610 (7)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3.docx

6 Pages
70 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Natural Science
Course
NATS 1610
Professor
Barbara Czaban
Semester
Winter

Description
Nats 1610­ Chapter 3 3.1: What is a cell? ­ A cell is built to carry out life functions efficiently Cell Theory:  1. Every organism is composed of one or more cells  2. The cell is the smallest unit having the properties of life 3. All cells come from pre­existing cells All cells have 3 things in common they have: 1. Outer plasma membrane: Covering that encloses a cell’s internal parts 2. They contain DNA 3. Cytoplasm: The contents of a cell between the outer plasma membrane and the  nucleus.  Two basic kinds of cells:  1. Prokaryotic cells: Cell in which the DNA is not contained inside a nucleus;  bacteria are prokaryotic cells 2. Eukaryotic cells: Cells that have their DNA inside the nucleus.   Organelle: Any of the compartments and sacs inside a cell.  Surface­to­volume ratio: The physical relationship by which the volume of a growing 3D  object increases faster than its surface area does.  Lipid bilayer: Structure of the plasma membrane, in which two parallel layers of  phospholipids form with their heads facing outward and tails inward.  • “Self sealing”, prohibition of free edges  • Membrane lipid bilayer impermeability  3.2: Organelles of Eukaryotic Cells  ­ Organelles isolate and physically organize chemical reactions in cells  ­ Nearly all organelles have an outer membrane that separates the inside of the  organelle from the cytosol and the rest of the cytoplasm.  ­ Organelles also provide separate locations for activities that occur in a sequence  of steps.   Organelles with membranes: Nucleus: protecting, controlling access to DNA Endoplasmic Reticulum: Routing, modifying new polypeptide chains; synthesizing lipids. Golgi body: Modifying new polypeptide chains; sorting, shipping proteins and lipids Vesicles: Transporting, storing, or digesting substances in a cell. Mitochondrion: Making ATP by sugar breakdown Lysosome: Intracellular digestion  Peroxisome: Inactivating toxins  Organelles without membranes:  Ribosomes: Assembling polypeptide chains Centriole: Anchor for cytoskeleton  3.3: How do we see cells? Microscopy: The use of a microscope to view objects, including cells, that is not visible  to the unaided eye.  Micrograph: The photograph of an image formed by a microscope.  3.4: The plasma membrane: A double layer of lipids The plasma membrane controls the movement of substances into and out of cells.  ­ The membrane is comprised of numerous proteins and lipids such as:  phospholipids, glycolipids, and cholesterol.  ­ What makes the membrane fluid is movement of molecules in it. Selective permeability: A property of the cell plasma membrane, in which the membrane  allows only certain substances to cross it.  3.6: The Nucleus ­ Nucleus contains and protects cells DNA, the genetic material.   Nucleus: Organelle that encloses a eukaryotic cell’s DNA.  ­ Key functions: prevents DNA from getting tangled with structures in the  cytoplasm. ­ Nuclear envelope: A double membrane that separates the inside of the nucleus  from the cytoplasm.  It has many pores.    Nucleolus: A cluster of the RNA and proteins used to assemble ribosomes from their  subunits.   DNA is organized into chromosomes:  Chromatin: A cell’s DNA molecules and proteins attached to them  Chromosomes: An individual DNA molecule and attached proteins.   ­ The nuclear envelope encloses the fluid part of the nucleus.  Proteins embedded in  the envelopes two bilayers control the passage of molecules between the nucleus  and the cytoplasm.  ­ The nucleolus is where the parts of ribosomes form before passing into the cell’s  cytoplasm.  3.7: The endomembrane system  Endomembrane system: System of membrane bound cell organelles that mainly modify  new proteins, build lipids, and package the completed molecules. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER): Channel­like organelle.  Lipids are assembled in smooth  ER.  In rough ER, side chains are added to newly formed polypeptides.   Ribosome: Organelle where protein polypeptide chains are built. ­ Rough ER has many ribosomes and builds new cell proteins ­ Smooth ER has zero ribosomes and lipids are assembled and many proteins are  modified into their final form.   Golgi body: Series of flattened saclike organelles in which new lipids and polypeptide  chains are processed into their final form.   Vesicle: Small membrane bound sac in cells. Some vesicles transport substances, others  digestive enzymes.
More Less

Related notes for NATS 1610

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit