Notes of Chapters 1-4.docx

5 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Operations Management and Information System
Course
OMIS 2010
Professor
Alan Marshall
Semester
Winter

Description
Statistics Chapter One ­ There are two kinds of statistics: Inferential and descriptive. ­ A population is the group of all items of interest; it is usually large (its  descriptive measures are called parameters) ­ A sample is part of the population being looked at (its descriptive measure is  called a Statistic and is used to infer about parameters) ­ A statistical inference is a prediction about the population based on sample data;  it is the process of converting data into information ­ It is understood that samples are not necessarily accurate, so there are measures  of reliability called the confidence level (how often an estimating procedure will  be correct) and the Significance level (how often the conclusion will be wrong in  the long run) Chapter Two 2.1 – Types of Data and Information ­ A variable is a characteristic of a population or sample and is usually represented  by an upper case letter; its values are the possible observations. ­ There are three kinds of data: Interval (numeric and quantitative), ordinal  (order), nominal (numbers represent categories) 2.2­ Graphical and Tabular techniques to describe nominal data ­ A frequency distribution measures how often an event occurs (can be used for  all types of data) ­ A relative frequency table lists the categories and proportion of the whole          vvv                                   ,,that each occurs ­ A bar chart shows frequency, height of rectangle shows how often, base is  arbitrary ­ A pie chart shows relative frequency (you have to multiply the relative frequency  by 360 degrees to find the size of the slice of the pie. 2.3­ Gr exraphical techniques to represent interval data ­ A histogram shows distributions of data; it’s a graph where the area of the bars  are proportional to the frequencies for various values of the variable. ­ Sturge’s Formula=1+3.3log(n)=the number of class intervals, n=number of  values ­ *Round to the nearest whole number because you can not have a part class ­ Class width= (largest observation­smallest observation)/ number of classes ­ *Each class is equal to or greater than the lower bound, less than the upper bound ­ A histogram can have different qualities that result in its differences in shape o Symmetry­ if you can draw a vertical line down the center and both sides  are equal in shape and size o Skewness  Refers to the location of the mode relative to a ‘tail’ • Positive=right, tail approaches infinity • Negative= left, tail approaches negative infinity o Modes    Unimodal­ one single peak  Bimodal­ two peaks­ not necessarily equal in height, indicates that  two different distributions are present o Bell­shaped  Special, symmetric, unimodal  ­ A Stem and leaf display splits the observations into 2 parts: a stem and a leaf.  There are different ways to do this. On its side it looks similar to a histogram­  each line represents frequency in the class defined by the stems; it is  advantageous to a histogram because you can see the actual observations ­ An Ogive displays cumulative relative frequency 2.4­ Describing Time Series Data ­Cross sectional data classifies observations by class at the same point in time ­ Time series data represents measurements at successive points in time (usually  depicted on a line chart­ variable on the vertical axis and time periods on the horizontal  axis) 2.5­ Describing the relationship between two nominal variables and comparing two  or more nominal data sets. ­ ‘Univariate’ application to single sets of data; ‘bivariate’ depicts the relationship  between different variables ­ a cross classification table is used to describe the relationship between two  nominal variables ­ Steps: 1.   Make a table that lists each person, his number or letter 2. count the number of times that each combination occurs 3. see if there is a relationship­ convert frequencies in each row/column to  relative frequencies (divide each row by the total) *totals may not equal 1  because of rounding ­ a graph depicting the relationship b/w 2 nominal variables will look like: ­ if the variables are unrelated, the patterns  in each section will be the same, if some  relationship exists­ some will differ from  others 2.6­ Describing the relationship between two  interval variables ­ A scatter diagram needs data for two  variables wherein 1 variable (y) depends­ to some degree­ on the other (x) ­ Linearity determines the strength of a linear relationship. A straight line is drawn  through the point in such a way that the line represents the relationship ­ The linear correlation looks at the degree in which changes in one variable are/  tend to be proportional to changes in another o A perfect positive (or direct) linear correlation occurs if y increases at a  constant rate as x increases o A perfect negative (or inverse) linear correlation is one in which y  decreases at a constant rate as x increases ­ The  line of best fit is the straight line that passes as close as possible to all of the  points in a scatter plot(its strength and direction are of interest Chapter 3­ Art and Science of Graphical Presentations 3.1 Graphical Excellence ­ Graphical excellence­ is when the graphs are concise, coherent, can replace  words, focus on substance (not form), don’t distort ­ Edward Tufte(Statistics Prof. at Yale) says that graphs should be multivariate, tell  truth, give the greatest amount of information in the least amount of space, show  interesting data ­ bad if small sets of data, Univariate, little useful info, foc
More Less

Related notes for OMIS 2010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit