Textbook Notes (367,782)
Canada (161,395)
York University (12,778)
Philosophy (78)
PHIL 1000 (8)
all (6)
Chapter 2

CHAPTER 2NOTES.docx

5 Pages
108 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1000
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
CHAPTER 2: THE ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS  THE ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT:  • Economic environment  ▯refers to the economic conditions in which an  organization operates.  • An economic condition or variable can include: job growth, consumer confidence,  interest rates.  • What makes up an economic environment?  ▯individuals, businesses, and the  government are the 3 key groups.  INDIVIDUALS:  • One economic decisions affects another.  • An individual is forced to make spending choices; the choice to purchase one  thing automatically precludes the possibility of purchasing others.  • This type of decision is referred to as opportunity cost – the best alternative  foregone.  BUSINESSES:  • In order for businesses to make a profit, managers have to balance the right  combination of inputs, allowing for efficiency, productivity, and overall firm  growth. • These inputs are known as the five factors of production  1. Natural resources 2. Labour 3. Capital  4. Knowledge  5. Entrepreneurs NATURAL RESOURCES: • Include land and raw materials below or above ground, such as soil, rocks,  minerals, trees, fruits, and vegetables.  • Raw materials also includes living organisms such as fish or agricultural products  such as milk or eggs.  • Ie) shell corporation, oil is a raw material that needs to be refined before it  becomes inventory and sold for profit.  • Ie) McCain foods uses potatoes as a raw material to make French fries, once they  are shipped to grocery stores the French fries  become a good available for the  consumer to purchase.   LABOUR: • Refers to the workers  • Employees that contribute their skills and strengths to create goods and services  for the owners of the business.  CAPITAL:  • Includes buildings, machines, tools, and other physical components used in  producing goods and services.  • Eg: CIBC uses capital such as buildings , computers, calculators, and safes to  operate its financial services business • Money is not a capital, it is an investment, since it cannot create or produce  anything on its own to earn income.  KNOWLEDGE:  • One of the most important factor of production in todays economy.  • Knowledge workers: individuals with specialized education, skills, training and  experience.  • Eg: google, facebook and twitter are built on their employees knowledge and  creative abilities. • By encouraging creativity at work, new knowledge can be developed and people  can be empowered to work better.  • ‘knowledge based economies”: for example are economies which involve the  production, distribution, and consumption of knowledge and info.  ENTREPRENEURS:  • individuals who establish a business in the pursuit of profit and to serve a need in  society.  • Owners, decision makers and risk takers.  • Unlike employees they have no guarantee they have an income in return for their  work and effort.  GOVERNMENT:  • Governments have a broader role.  • They purchase goods an services for the welfare and wellbeing of both its citizens  and its business­community members.  • Responsible for making laws, regulations, and policies to manage the country’s  economy.  • To guide the economy to the right direction, the government can influence  individual choices with tax credits or business decisions with tax incentives.  • Eg: federal government encourages individuals to save for their retirement by  allowing a tax deduction if they contribute to a registered and retirement savings  plan (RRSP)  • The government can also encourage innovation in order for the economy to grow.  • One challenge for the Canadian government is to ensure qualified and skilled  labour is available in the country to support economic growth.  ANALYZING THE ECONOMY: TWO APPROACHES  • Microeconomics: the study of smaller components of the economy such as  individuals and businesses.  • Ie: economists of microeconomics analyze consumer demand and existing supply.  • Macroeconomics: study of larger economic issues involving the economy as a  whole. • more complex since it considers evaluating data for larger groups of people and  firms  • examples of issues in macroeconomics: unemployment, consumption, inflation,  gross domestic product and price levels.  • The role of the government is also studied at this level.  • Economic policies are one way in which a government can influence an economic 
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1000

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit