Textbook Notes (367,906)
Canada (161,487)
York University (12,778)
Psychology (3,584)
PSYC 1010 (1,086)
Chapter

Module 16-22 Late Development & Conditioning.docx

7 Pages
43 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 1010
Professor
Heather Jenkin
Semester
Fall

Description
Module 16 Physical Changes in Middle Adulthood • Brings a decline in physical stamina and fertility • Menopause around the age of 50 • Men have decline in sperm count, testosterone levels, speed of erection, and  ejaculation  Life Expectancy  • 1950 – 49, 2010 – 69­80 • Males are more prone to die younger – infant rates are higher  • Women outlive by 4 years • Telomeres – tips of chromosomes – wear down causing aging cells to die without  being replaces • Low stress and good health habits elongate life Sensory Abilities • Visual sharpness diminishes, distance perception, adaptation to light are less acute • Muscle strength, reaction time, stamina diminishes along with smell and hearing • Pupils shrink and become less transparent – reduces reaction time to light Health • Immune system weakens  • Build up of antibodies – suffer fewer short term ailments • Slowing of neural processing  • Areas of memory begin to weaken  • Exercise slows aging • Enhances muscles, bones, and energy – prevents obesity, heart disease –  stimulates brain cell development and neural connections Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease • Strokes, tumors, or alcohol dependency can damage brain – mental erosion is  dementia • Alzheimer’s – first memory, then reasoning – 5 to 20 years become emotionally  flat, disoriented, disinhibited, incontinent, mentally vacant • Loss of brain cells and neurons which produce acetylcholine  • Can check spinal fluid for protein fragments Cognitive Development • Memory begins to worsen  • Perspective memory stays strong when given a trigger • Depends on the information trying to remember – if it is meaningless harder to  remember • Cross sectional studies – comparing different age groups • Longitude studies – restudying people over time • Last 3­4 years of life cognitive declines quicker – terminal decline Adulthood’s Ages and Stages • Midlife transition – midlife crisis – most of your life is now behind you • Social clock – definition of the “right time” to leave home, get a job, marry, have  kids, retire – varies from era to era and culturally Adulthood’s Commitments • Two aspects dominate adulthood – intimacy and generativity – being productive  and supporting future generations • The healthy adult is one who can love and work Love • Monogamy makes sense – parents who nurture child are more likely to have  genes passed on • Couples who marry often endure, especially after 20 and educated  • 1 in 2 marriages will divorce • Women depend less on men and have higher expectations • Living together before marriage has higher rate of divorce and marital  dysfunction  • High marriage rates have lower crime, delinquency, and emotional disorder  among children • 5 to 1 ration – 5 good things to 1 bad thing in a marriage • Children absorb time, money, emotional energy – marriage satisfaction may  decline – more with women who work and take care of home • Post honeymoon period – when children leave home – empty next syndrome but  happy Work • Fits interests and creates sense of accomplishment and competence Well Being Across the Life Span • Regrets focus less on mistakes and more on things we failed to do • Life satisfaction declines as death nears • Less trouble with social relationships – less anger, stress, and worry • Amygdala responds less to negative events, but not to positive – makes the  positive seem even better – less interaction with hippocampus  • Bad feelings fade faster then good ones – general positive outlook Death and Dying • Grieving in old age may be short lived • Severe when death is unexpected  • Grieving does not go through stages Module 20 How Do We Learn • Learning – the process of acquiring new and relatively enduring information or  behaviors  • Allows us to adapt to environments  • Classic conditioning – to expect and prepare for significant events – food, pain • Operant conditioning – learning to repeat acts that bring rewards – avoid acts with  unwanted results • Cognitive learning – new behaviors through observing, language helps to learn  without observing • Associations are learned subtly – feed out habitual behavior  • Associative learning – linking two events that occur close together • Cognitive learning – acquiring mental information that guides our behavior Classic Conditioning • Pavlov’s dogs is famous classic conditioning experiment Pavlov’s Experiment • Dogs salivating – respondent behaviors – behaviors that occur as an automatic  response to stimuli • Neutral stimuli (NS) – events the dog could see or hear but didn’t associate with  food • Food automatically, unconditionally triggers salivary reflex • Unconditional response (UR) – the drooling • Unconditional stimuli (US) – the food • Conditioning response (CR) – learned tone associated with food • Conditional stimuli (CS) – learned tone without food Acquisition • Intentional learning • Conditioning doesn’t happen when NS follows US • Conditioning helps an animal survive and reproduce by responding to cues that  help gain food, avoid danger, locate mates, and produce offspring • Higher­order condit
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit