Textbook Notes (358,957)
Canada (155,965)
York University (12,166)
Psychology (3,512)
PSYC 1010 (1,063)
Chapter

Module 23-26 Memory.docx

5 Pages
97 Views
Unlock Document

School
York University
Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 1010
Professor
Heather Jenkin
Semester
Fall

Description
Module 23 Studying Memory • Memory – learning that has persisted over time • Recall – retrieving information that is not currently in your conscious awareness • Recognition – identifying items previously learned • Relearning – learning something more quickly when you learn it a second time Measures of Retention • Recall, recognition, and relearning are measures of retention  • Tests of recognition and of time spent relearning demonstrate that we remember  more then we recall Memory Models • Encoding – getting information into our brain • Storage – retaining information  • Retrieval – later getting information back out • Connectionism – model which views memories as products of interconnected  neural networks • 3 stages proposed to explain memory forming process (Atkinson & Shiffrin) o Sensory memory – fleeting information that is recorded first o Short term memory – information sent, encoded through rehearsal o Long term memory – information sent there for later retrieval  Working Memory • Short term memory – small, brief storage space for recent thoughts and  experiences • Processes incoming information and linking it with long term memories • Working memory – new understanding of short term memory – focuses on  conscious, active processing of incoming information Dual Track Memory: Effortful vs Automatic Processing • Explicit memories – facts and experiences that we can consciously know and  declare – also called declarative memory • Effortful processing – encoding that requires attention and conscious effort • Automatic processing – encoding of incidental information which barges through • Implicit memories – created through automatic processing – momentary sensory  memory of visual stimuli – also called nondeclarative memories Encoding and Automatic Processing • Information which is automatically processed – time, space, and frequency Encoding and Effortful Processing • Reading is not automatic – with practice becomes automatic Sensory Memory • Iconic memory – fleeting sensory memory of visual stimuli  • Echoic memory – fleeting sensory memory of auditory stimuli Capacity of Short Term and Working Memory • Capacity varies on age and other factors Effortless Processing Strategies • Chunking – organizing items into familiar, manageable units – occurs  automatically • Mnemonics – memory aids, especially those techniques that use vivid imagery  and organizational devices • Hierarchies – when you are an expert in an area, you chunk information but also  in hierarchies – few broad concepts divided and subdivided  • Spacing effect – tendency for distributing study to yield better long term retention  that is achieved through massed study or practice   • Testing effect – enhancing memory after retrieving rather then just reading –  sometimes called retrieval practice effort or test enhanced learning Levels of Processing • Shallow processing – encodes at very basic level – words letters • Deep processing – encodes semantically – based on meaning of word Module 24 Retaining Information in the Brain • Used to think whole past in complete detail was somewhere in the brain • Information is not stored in discrete precise locations Explicit­Memory System: The Frontal Lobes and Hippocampus • Explicit memories – network which processes and stores including frontal lobe  and hippocampus – facts and experiences that can are consciously known • Left and right frontal lobe process different types of memory  • Hippocampus is the same as a save button – names, images, events – damage  disrupts memory • Left hippocampus damage – verbal disruption  • Right hippocampus damage – visual and location disruption • Different parts remember different things • Memories are not permanently stored here – after 48 hours memory is sent to long  term storage • Sleep supports memory – greater hippocampus activity at night the better your  memory  Implicit­Memory System: The Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia • Implicit memories – skills and conditioning learnt through automatic processing • Cerebellum helps to form and store implicit memories • Basal ganglia involves motor movement and skill memory – explains why we  remember how to ride a bike years later • Conscious memories from our first 3 years is blank – infantile amnesia  • Two reasons for amnesia – explicit memory is reme
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 1010

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit