Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
York University (12,867)
Psychology (3,584)
PSYC 1010 (1,086)
Chapter

Module 35-37+46 Emotions.docx

8 Pages
81 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 1010
Professor
Heather Jenkin
Semester
Fall

Description
Module 46 Psychology of Attraction  • Proximity – geographical nearness – most powerful friendship predictor • More inclines to like those in same neighborhood, work associates, eat in the  same places • Mere exposure effect – repeat exposure to novel stimuli increase our liking for  them • We like people who’s face contains some of our own features  • First impression is always made superficially by both sexes • We perceive better looking as healthier, happier, more sensitive, successful, and  socially skilled • Attractiveness is unrelated to self esteem and happiness • Few of us find ourselves unattractive • Overly attractive people are aware of their looks and are suspicious of praise –  think its only for looks • Men find youthful, fertile, and low waist to hip ratio attractive • Women find healthy looking, mature, dominant, masculine, and affluent attractive • Friends and couples share common attitudes, beliefs, interests, age, religion, race,  education, intelligence, smoking behavior, and economic status • More alike the more likely you are to endure • Similarity breeds content – dissimilarity fosters disfavor • Reward theory of attraction – we like those whose behavior is rewarding to us –  we continue relationships that offer more rewards then costs Romantic Love • Passionate love – an aroused state of intense positive absorption in another,  usually present at the beginning of a love relationship • Two factor theory of emotions o Have 2 ingredients – physical arousal and cognitive appraisal o Arousal can enhance emotions • Adrenaline makes the heart grow fonder • Compassionate love – a deep affectionate attachment we feel for those with whom  our lives are intertwined  • Passion is facilitated by hormones which subside – replaced by oxytocin which  supports trust, calmness, and bonding  • Equity – condition in which people receive from a relationship in proportion to  what they give – key to gratifying and enduring relationship • Self disclosure – the revealing of intimate details about ourselves – helps to grow  intimacy • Relationship must have positive support to endure • Self disclosing intimacy + mutually supportive equity = enduring compassionate  love  Altruism • An unselfish concern for the welfare of others • Became psychological concern because of sexual assault on March 13 1964 • Stalker repeatedly stabbed Kitty Genovese then raped her – screamed for help at  3.30 am – neighbors windows open but no one came to help her • We will help only if the situation enables us first to notice the incident, then  interpret an emergency, and finally to assume responsibility for helping • If people are around during these steps we may not help • More people share the responsibility of helping there is a diffusion of  responsibility • Bystander effect – the tendency for any given bystander to be less likely to help if  other bystanders are around  The Norms of Helping • Social exchange theory – self interest underlies all human interaction – our  constant goal is to maximize rewards and minimize costs • Reciprocity norm – expectation that we should return help to those who have  helped us • Social responsibility norm – we should help those who need our help even if  the  costs out weight the reward Peacekeeping • Conflict – incompatibility of actions, goals, or ideas • Social traps – situations which the conflicting parties, by each rationally pursuing  their self interest, become caught in mutually destructive behavior  • Mirror image perception – those in a conflict create a diabolical image of one  another • Promote peace through contact, cooperation, communication, and conciliation • Superordinate goals – shared goals that could be achieved only through  cooperation  • GRIT – graduated and reciprocated initiatives in tension reduction – strategy  designed to decrease international tension  Module 35 Cognition and Emotion • Emotion – response to the whole organism – psychological arousal, expressive  behavior, and conscious experience – positive or negative feelings (affect) • Link between motivation and emotion – react emotionally when goals are  gratified, threatened or frustrated – strong reactions to important goals • Directs attention – part of arousal system which increases chance of survival • Negative emotions narrow our attention – increased physiological activation –  leads to fight or flight • Positive emotions broaden our thinking – explorations and skill learning –  happens in safe environment  • Social communication – provides information about our internal state • Can influence others behaviors towards us • Emotional messages are important to early life – get upset when mothers express  fear • 4 common features of emotions o Responses to stimuli o Result from cognitive appraisal of stimuli – think into emotion o Bodies respond physiologically to stimuli o Emotions include behavioral tendencies • Full body/mind/behavior response to situation • James­Lange theory – William James and Carl Lange – first comes feeling then  conscious awareness – sad because we cry, angry because we strike – body comes  before thoughts • Cannon­Bard theory – Walter Cannon and Philip Bard – bodily responses and  emotions occur separately but simultaneously – heart beats as you feel fear – body  come with thoughts • Adjusted Cannon­Bard theory – emotions are not just separate mental experiences  – when body responses are blocked (epidural), emotions don’t feel as intense • Cognition can influence our interpretation of emotions – rollercoasters some love  some hate – same stimuli different interpretation  • Low spinal cord injury felt same emotional intensity, high spinal cord injury  reported change Cognition Can Define Emotion: Schachter and Singer • Stanley Schachter and Jerome Singer – emotional experience requires a conscious  interpretation of arousal – physical reaction and thoughts create emotion together • Singer­Schachter two­factor theory – emotions have 2 ingredients – physical  arousal and cognitive appraisal – body plus thoughts • Emotions don’t exist at all until we can label them • Spillover effect – arousal from a previous event affects another one – after a run  you find out you got a job  • Injected volunteers with adrenaline – told would either have a physiological effect  or no effect (informed/uninformed) – put in a room with an actor who was either  happy or angry  • If you knew you would have a response in the happy room you would realize it  wasn’t your own emotions, it is the drug – you feel changes but you don’t respond  to emotions • If you were uninformed you would think it was your own emotion • Arousal affects emotion, cognition channels it • Suspension bridge study – walking across bridge– high arousal level – people  look better then when on ground Cognition May Not Precede Emotion: Zajonc, LaDoux, and Lazarus • Robert Zajonc – we have many emotional reactions apart or before our  interp
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit