Textbook Notes (368,796)
Canada (162,165)
York University (12,867)
Psychology (3,584)
PSYC 1010 (1,086)
Chapter 14

Chapter 14- psychology final exam

6 Pages
176 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 1010
Professor
Gerry Goldberg
Semester
Winter

Description
Psychology­ Chapter 14 Psychological disorders Abnormal behaviours: Myths, Realities, and Controversies  Medical Model applied to abnormal behaviour:  ­ The medical model: proposes that it is useful to think of abnormal behaviour as a  disease.   ­ Refers to mental illness, psychological disorder, and psychopathology.  ­ Middle ages people with these disorders were thought to have a demon in them,  and were “treated” with chants, and rituals.  ­ Thomas Szasz: abnormal behaviour usually involves a deviation from social  norms rather than an illness.  ­ Diagnosis: involves distinguishing one illness from another ­ Etiology: refers to the apparent causation and developmental history of an illness. ­ Prognosis: is a forecast about the probable course of an illness.  Criteria of abnormal behaviour: 1. Deviance: people are said to have a disorder because their behaviour deviates  from what their society considers acceptable.  Transvestic fetishism: when a man  gets aroused by dressing in women’s clothing.  2. Maladaptive behaviour: people are appeared to have a disorder because their  everyday adaptive behaviour is impaired.  This criterion goes to people where  drugs may interfere with social interactions.  3. Personal distress: Psychological disorders are based on an individuals report of  great personal distress. This criterion is for people who are troubled with  depression.  Stereotypes of psychological disorders: 1. Psychological disorders are incurable.  2. People with psychological disorders are often violent and dangerous 3. People with psychological disorders behave in bizarre ways and are very different  from normal people.  Psychodiagnosis: Classification of disorders ­ American Psychiatric Association’s: Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental  disorders.  (DSM)  ­ Consists of 5 axis levels: Axis 1: Clinical syndromes (Substance abuse, mood and eating disorder) Axis 2: Personality disorders or Mental retardation Axis 3:  General medical conditions Axis 4: Psychosocial and Environmental problems  Axis 5: Global assessment of functioning scale (GAF)  ­ Comorbidity: the coexistence of two or more disorders.   The prevalence of psychological disorders: ­ Epidemiology: the study of the distribution of mental or physical disorders in a  population.  ­ Prevalence: refers to the percentage of a population that exhibits a disorder during  a specified time period.  Anxiety Disorders: ­ Anxiety disorders: are a class of disorders marked by feelings of excessive  apprehension and anxiety.  ­ 5 types of anxiety disorders: Generalized, phobic disorder, panic disorder and  agoraphobia, obsessive­compulsive disorder, and post­traumatic stress disorder.  Generalized anxiety disorder: marked by a chronic, high level of anxiety that is not tied to  any specific threat.   ­ People worry about yesterday’s mistakes and tomorrow’s problems. ­ Also worry about minor issues with family, and finances.  Phobic disorder: marked by a persistent and irrational fear of an object or situation that  presents no realistic danger.   ­ Peoples fears interfere with everyday behaviour ­ Acrophobia: fear of heights ­ Brontophobia: fear of storms Panic disorder and agoraphobia:  ­ Panic disorder: characterized by recurrent attacks of overwhelming anxiety that  usually occur suddenly and unexpectedly.   ­ Agoraphobia: is a fear of going out to public places.  ­ People become confined to their houses due to this Obsessive­Compulsive disorder: is marked by persistent, uncontrollable intrusions of  unwanted thoughts (obsessions) and urges to engage in senseless rituals (compulsions).  Post­Traumatic stress disorder:  ­ People get this with rape, assault, severe automobile accidents, a natural disaster,  or witnessing someone’s death.  ­ 7­8% of people have suffered from PTSD Etiology of anxiety disorders: Biological factors: ­ Concordance rates: indicates the percentage of twin pairs or other pairs of  relatives who exhibit the same disorder  ­ Inhibited temperament: characterized by shyness, timidity, and wariness.  ­ Many phobias caused by classical conditioning ­ Example: A child is buried under snow by an avalanche, when she becomes an  adult she may be afraid of snow.   Cognitive factors: ­ Some people are more likely to suffer from anxiety if: A) misinterpret harmless  situations as threatening, B) Focus excessive attention on perceived threats, C)  Selectively recall information that seems threatening. ­ Cognitive theorists maintain that certain styles of thinking, especially a tendency  to over interpret harmless situations as threatening, make people more vulnerable  to anxiety.  Dissociative disorders: are classes of disorders in which people lose contact with  portions of their consciousness or memory, resulting in disruptions in their sense of  identity.  Three types of dissociative disorders:  1) Dissociative amnesia: is a sudden loss of memory for important personal  information that is too extensive to be due to normal forgetting.   2) Dissociative fugue: people lose their memory for their entire lives along with their  sense of personal identity.  3) Dissociative identity disorder: involves the coexistence in one person of two or  more largely complete, and usually
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit