Textbook Notes (368,588)
Canada (161,988)
York University (12,849)
Psychology (3,584)
PSYC 2130 (185)
Chapter 2

Personality Chapter 2

4 Pages
67 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2130
Professor
Heather Jenkin
Semester
Summer

Description
Chapter 2 Clues to Personality: The Basic Sources of Data • Henry Murray – personality psychologist – to understand personality you need to  first look at it • Can do 4 different things to look at someone’s personality o Ask them directly about their opinion of themselves – what is usually done o Find out what other people say about the subject o Check how the person is fairing in life o Observe what the person does and try to measure behavior objectively • Personality is a manifestation of individuals thoughts, feelings, and behaviors • Need to rely on all 4 aspects to fully understand personality • Funder’s second law – there are no perfect indications of personality – there are  only clues and clues are always ambiguous Data Are Clues • Clues – observable aspects of personality • Always unclear since personality is hidden deep within – need to infer • Inferences need to be based on observable behavior • Must gather as much information as possible – remain skeptical that all clues are  attributed to personality • Cannot ignore data just because it is misleading • Funder’s third law – something beats nothing, two times out of three Four Kinds of Clues • All equally important with their own shortcomings Asking a Person Directly – S Data • S data – self judgments • Usually done through questionnaires usually done on a 9 point scale of true/false  • Usually the way people describe themselves is similar to how others would  describe them • Worlds best expert about your personality is you • S data is straightforward and simple – psychologist is not interpreting data • Questionnaires have face validity – intended to measure what they seem to  measure – questions are direct and obvious • Questionnaires really ask same question in different phrases or open ended  questions based on their opinion • Five advantages o Large amount of information  o Access to thoughts, feelings, and intentions o Definitional truth – self views are always correct o Casual force – reflects what you think of yourself, which create your  reality o Self verification – people work hard to make others treat them in a  manner that confirms their self conception   o Simple and easy – cost effective • Three disadvantages  o They may not tell you – people may choose not to provide accurate  information  o They may not be able to tell you – memory about your own behavior is  imperfect, lack of insight, repressed memories, wrong self­judgments o Fish and water effect – people may be used to the way they react and  behave that their own actions stop seeming remarkable – kind for so long  you don’t notice its unusual – personality becomes invisible to yourself o Too simple and too easy – leads to it being overused Ask Someone Who Knows – I Data  • I stands for “informant” • I data – judgments by knowledgeable informants about general attributes of the  individual’s personality – traits • Informants are asked questions – answers are the data • Informants usually don’t have formal expertise in psychology  • I data is made of judgments – they derive from somebody observing somebody  else in whatever context they happen to be in and then render a general opinion  based on observation • Judgments, subjective, and human • Five advantages  o Large amount of information – close friends and family are all informants o Common sense – informant will observe behavior with 2 kinds of context  in account  Immediate situation – situation can affect interpretation of  behavior  How subject reacts to other situations – if you know someone has  been kind in a situation, informant will interpret them as kind  rather then rude o Definition truth – certain traits can only be identified by outside sources –  charm, likeability, sense of humor, attractiveness, obnoxiousness o Casual force – research into the persons reputation  o Expectancy effect/behavioral confirmation – becoming what other  people expect of you  • Four disadvantages  o Limited behavioral information – informants have not been with the  person for life and has limited knowledge in 2 ways
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2130

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit