Textbook Notes (367,974)
Canada (161,538)
York University (12,784)
Psychology (3,584)
PSYC 3280 (11)
Chapter 11

CHAPTER 11.docx

3 Pages
48 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 3280
Professor
Suzanne Mcdonald
Semester
Fall

Description
10/21/2013 CHAPTER 11: FORAGING Foraging behaviour: searching for and consuming food  Finding Food and the Search Image Search image theory: when animals encounter a prey type more and more, they form a  representation of that target that become more detailed with experience: this leads the forager to becoming  more successful at finding that type of prey  Animals learn something relevant about their prey so they can assess what is prey and what is not prey  Optimal Foraging Theory (OFT) OFT is a bunch of mathematical models (called optimization theory) used to predict various aspects of  animal foraging behaviour w.in a given set of constraints  There are four models that talk about the following questions: What to Eat? To decide between 2 different foods –foods have different energy values, encounter rates & handling times  associated w/ them  Encounter rate: how often you can find it  Handling rate: how long it takes to kill and ingest  Energy value: calories  Profitability of the food is based on the energy/handling time – greater the ratio of energy/handling, the  greater the profitability  If a prey has a high ratio of the former, but has a low encounter rate, other prey will be introduced into the  diet (if the first prey had a high encounter rate, than another prey probably wouldn’t be introduced into the  diet)  Where to Eat?  Marginal value theorem: math model that predicts how long a forager should stay in a patch (area  that has a large amount of food for the forager) before moving to another patch  He will eventually need to move patches, because he is feeding in a dense patch, that becomes less dense  since hes eating there  When he moves to another patch the forager must pay some cost i.e. energy moving, higher chance of  predation during travel, etc.  The MVT makes predictions regarding patch residence time: Stay in a patch until the marginal rate of food intake is equal to that of the average rate of food intake  across all patches available – so stay in the patch until you eat enough that’s equal to the average amount  of food you could get in the other patches, since you have to pay a cost to get to other patches  The greater the time b.w patches, the longer the forager should stay in a patch  For patches that are already generally poor quality, the forager should stay longer than if it were foraging in  an environment full of more profitable patches – make up for the travel costs you should stay in a poor  patch longer than a good patch to obtain a fixed amount of energy  Specific Nutrient Constraints Animals need to spend time foraging for specific nutrients essential for survival  A math model called linear programming is used for this problem – designed to handle optimality problems  in which some optimum must be achieved in the face a particular constraint Risk­Sensitive Fo
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 3280

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit