Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
York University (12,867)
SOSC 1375 (25)
Chapter

Reading notes .docx

7 Pages
101 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Social Science
Course
SOSC 1375
Professor
Olena Kobzar
Semester
Winter

Description
The Meaning of Law:Traditional Interpretation  2014­01­24   The law controls our lives in many more ways than we are aware and we are aware of what the law requires  and forbids  Morality & Law  Separation thesis ­> analysis of law requires the separation of law and morality ; defining character of legal  positivism  Law & morality intersecting  Law is commonly known for the protection for people from people threaten the interests of others Criminal offences are seen to be morally wrong  If it is wrong it must be illegal, if it is legal it must be morally required or at least morally acceptable  This is true but we can say there is an overlap b/w morality and the law.  Law & morality diverging  Law is less demanding than any serious moral code  Law is more prohibition rather than positive demands = establishing boundaries  More restraint  Law can be more demanding than morality  Eg. Non­threatening traffic offences (can break law w/o doing anything wrong in particular)  Contemporary disagreement over law and morality not harmonizing is, for example, right to own firearms or  the stage of pregnancy at which abortions can take place or become unacceptable  The laws cannot reflect the moral code bc there is no general agreement as to what’s right or wrong  Myth of congruence b/w law & morality is reflected by history, injustice and struggle of equality & human  rights  Eg. Slavery, racial segregation  01/24/2014 01/24/2014 Indigenous Perspectives & Legal Pluralism 2014­01­24 Reading #1: Customary Law, Sentencing and the Limits of the state  Takes place in North territory of Australia  Difference b/w customary law and white legal system  Practice of customary laws may help repair damaged aboriginal communities  The issue with customary law punishment has stretched the limits of the criminal law in a range of  sentencing judgments  Might create a soft legal pluralism (coexistence)  The judiciary has attempted to maintain control over customary punishment while being beholden to  Aboriginal communities for evidence of appropriate customary responses and for carrying out promised  punishments  This leads to aboriginal being supervised and supervisor and state being in and out of control  “White Poison”: Alcohol abuse and social devastation  Alcohol abuse = main concern of law and order to Aboriginal people  Shows cultural breakdown and strong connections b/w people committing sexual offences  Case of Juli – was under the influence of alcohol when found guilty of 2 counts of sexual assault and when  he committed violent offences  Alcoholism is tied to aboriginals being disadvantaged  This has become a stereotype and entrenched in the lives of Aboriginals  Subjects and objects of knowledge  Customary law is open to judges to apply them to cases  Sentencing can play a supporting role in the achievement of peace in AB communities ­> usage of  customary law  Focus on devestation of AB as witness and representatives from their local courts and use AB people to  provide knowledge to “white” courts about themselves for sentencing, etc.  Eg. Miyatatawuy, defendant guilty of assaulting husband got support from victim for non­custodial penalty  but rather has already been dealt with customary law  AB culture is sought with respect to penalty  Looking within the communities to repair, not outside in the “white”  Customary punishment is not necessarily accepted as legal and they must pledge to the already set in legal  system to experience themselves as legal subjects  Customary law has become intrinsic to general law sentencing process, more evidence of implementation =  judges appear more flexible about penalty imposed.  The expanding arsenal of penalty  28.8% are AB in that region, 75% in custody were AB  Thus the consideration that payback was likely to take place was merely one of a number of “material facts”  to be taken into account.  Indigenous Perspectives & Legal Pluralism 2014­01­24 The fact that payback was something intrinsically associated with the defendant’s Aboriginality did not  mean that it should be ignored. Mildren J. also recognized a general concern, that as a rule, people should  not be punished twice for same offence. the usual reason why courts say that they do not condone payback is because “(…) it is a form of corporal  punishment, carried out by persons not employed by the State to impose punishment (…)”77 rather than  because tribal punishment is unlawful per se. Reading #2: ABORIGINAL CONCEPTS OF JUSTICE Aboriginal people and the Role of the Elders  Elders are the “teachers” of the tribe Bridge traditions and modern things  in almost all Aboriginal belief 
More Less

Related notes for SOSC 1375

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit