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Week 8- Wednesday February 26 Disability, Accessibility and Embodiment feb 26.pdf

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Department
Social Science
Course Code
SOSC 1502
Professor
Amar Wahab

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Week 8: Wednesday February 26 Disability,Accessibility and Embodiment Readings: §Wendell, The Social Construction of Disability (CK) §Butler withTaylor, Interdependence (CK) §Pemina Yellow Bird, Wild Indians: Native Perspectives on the Hiawatha Asylum for Insane Indians (Moodle) §native people are the intergenerational survivors of a holocaust §nations reduced by european diseases, warfare and other genocidal practices of the federal government §newcomers seemed greedy and barbaric, savages who did not respect life, us or regard aboriginals as human §superior numbers and weapons combined with utter lack of conscience and a uneuqnchable greed made formidable killers of native people §native people are the intergenerational survivors of the holocaust §highest rates of suicice, infant mortality, lowest life expectancy §chronically short on housing, jobs, economic development §must grieve the years they couldn't §must tell the stories of loss, violation, what happened to us, long last grieve through things, determine how the past informs us §must speak the truth about the holocaust so can stop indians for something blaming us government is solely responsible for §mythologization of american history §US violence in the name of democracy and god §hiawatha insane asylum for indians §congress passed law to prevent indians of practicing their own spirituality §ceremonies became criminal activities §christan boarding schools beat the indian out of them §indians became abusive onto their own §native ppl had no access to courts or lawyers or citizenship §kill them, weaken them, make them stop being who they are by punishing them for praying and by taking their childen away through forced assimilation then we take their land through treaties where we promise to pay them a fraction of what their land is worth, then steal the payment and sell it to other people who are settling the land we stole which expands our territory and increases our tax bandit §hiawatha insane asylum for indians began in 1899 to attract settlers, creat jobs and build the economy §need someone to care for the savages §white people deciding who's insane but cant understand their language §aslong as the bureau has the power to to declare tribal members insane, unparalleled level of control over sobering nations and as long as canton asylum was supplied with patients the money rolled in and the local business folk were happy §there because refused to give up spiritual life or fought with teacher, spouse, reservation agent or refused to allow their child to go to boarding school §stayed until dead §refused home visits §lots of young people who had difficulty at school or reservation agency §sick patients with tybercluois, gallstones, epileptic seizures, syphillus, flu §buried on that land of their sadness, not with their family §beaten, shaved, raped, singing death song Film: Clip from Examined Life ▯ Below are the quiz questions for the Feb. 26 tutorial: 1. According to Wendell, what are at least three ways in which social conditions affect the rates of disability. 1. the pace of life: assumed expectation of performance — failure to give people the amount / kind of help to participate in all major aspects of society, including making significant contributions in the form of work or protecting them from serious injuries 2. lack of public health and safety standards and practices —lack of good prenatal care can cause disabilities in babies and pregnant women, inadequate medical care to those who are already ill or injured results in unnecessary disablement 3. environment that provides accessibility to people with range of physical characteristics and abilities —lack of water, food, clothing, shelter can lead to malnutrition and indirect diseases that attack the malnourished, can be contracted from water ▯ 2. Pemina Yellow Bird, in her article, refers to those whose were "incarcerated" the Hiawatha InsaneAsylum as being "supposedly insane". What does she mean by this? - “White people” decided they were insane but they came to these assumptions without full understanding of their language or culture or beliefs. The natives could not properly communicate their feelings or why they decided to act the way they did so anything seen as “Not normal” they could associate with different or insane. - If a person refused to give up spiritual life or fought with teacher, spouse, reservation agent or refused to allow their child to go to boarding school they could be sent to this asylum. - Native ppl had no access to courts or lawyers or citizenship so could not fight back against thisAsylum. - Aslong as the bureau has the power to to declare tribal members insane, unparalleled level of control over sobering nations and as long as canton asylum was supplied with patients the money rolled in and the local business folk were happy. No one cared about the mental or physical state of the “patients” as long as they could colour them insane and get the money because of them was all the whites cared about. ▯ 3. In the article in the course kit, "Judith Butler with Sunaura Taylor", what do that authors claim is required for physical access to happen and what are the obstacles to its realization? - Dependent on social norm - walking social acceptable to use legs—disabled can do it in a wheel chair but not accepted - Society only made to sustain norm - able bodied can walk in any environment / disabled can only go as far as permitted (no curb = no more walking) - Society not making other known - normalizing how we use our bides (use mouth to hold cup is not norm and unacceptable) - capitalism exploits this dependency and they state who is worth protecting, valuing, etc - must normalize and accept that they may need help but they are able to do what we are if given the proper environment and practices promoting their ability ▯ Lecture Critiquing the Medical Perspective • Dominant (Medical) discourse: scientific reasoning of impairment as biological: – Based on scientific knowledge that determines/produces the “normality” of bodies; – Pathology: “abnormality’ produced and treated through medical disciplines (e.g. psychiatry depends on
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