Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
York University (12,867)
Sociology (288)
SOCI 1010 (77)
Chapter

SOC_Ch6.docx

2 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCI 1010
Professor
Stanley Tweyman
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 6 – Early Sociological Theorists Karl Marx – communist manifesto ­ Political activist and social scientist ­ As a revolutionary, he sought the overthrow of capitalism which he believed to be based on the  oppression of the many (working class, proletariat) by the few (owners of productive property,  bourgeoisie) ­ Looked forward to the replacement of communism with a new social order called advanced  communism in which individuals would be free to realize their fullest potential ­ More of a humanist in terms of which he was affected by the suffering/exploitation among the  working class under capitalism. It was humanism that led him to call for a revolution to  overthrown capitalism ­ His theories are in turn his reactions to Hegel’s writings. Espec that of philosophical idealism: Philosophical Idealism o Denial of physical things o The idea that thought creates reality o Physical things lack veritable being – that they are essentially not real ­ Marx rejected philosophical idealism ­ Believed that physical needs/requirements are so central to human life that they come before any  intellectual needs – can be fulfilled by direct productive activity ­ He believed that the objects essential to meeting each individual exist OUTSIDE of that  individual and are indispensable to the manifestations and confirmations of that individuals  “essential powers”; that an individual can only ‘express his life in real, sensuous objects’; they  make material well­being the most important part of human existence ­ Used dialectical materialism consisting in terms of pttrns of opposition in class conflict. This  dialectical method does not focus on ideas, but rather on the material conditions of people’s  existence ­ Believed all societies are composed of integrated classes of people; no one class can be  understood abstracted from its relationship to the other classes. Certain classes come into conflict  with one another and through this conflict, CHANGE OCCURS.  ­ Marx’s task was to discover the exact conditions (in capitalist societies) under which freely  acting, individual members of a given social class (proletariat) would finally recognize their  common class interest, unite together and bring about the next social revolution Friedrich Engels (1820­1895) ­ Influenced Marx ­ Developed the argument that, because it the political economy is based on private property and  trade competition, industrial society is the most inhuman and exploitive form of social  organization in human history ­ Capitalism is enormously productive, yet it forces people to distrust and exploit each other  because marketplace competitions leads everyone to try the
More Less

Related notes for SOCI 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit