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Chapter 14

SOC-3360 Chapter Notes - Chapter 14: Mandatory Sentencing, Halfway House, Probation Officer


Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC-3360
Professor
Edward Pardue
Chapter
14

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Juvenile Courts
TRIAL PROCEEDINGS FOR JUVENILE COURT
Most juvenile cases are bifurcated (two parts): adjudication phase and penalty phase.
Steps in the Juvenile Court:
oAdjudication: The judge determines if the juvenile is guilty or not guilty.
The Supreme Court determined that juveniles do not have the right to trial by
jury. However, 10 states do allow juveniles to have a trial by jury.
oBifurcated Hearing: includes the disposition
oJuveniles do not have a constitutional right to appeal their state. However, most states
have written statutes that permit juveniles to appeal their case.
Judicial Alternatives:
oDismissal, Restitution, Outpatient Psychiatric Therapy, Probation, Foster Home
Placement, Day Treatment Program, Community-Based Residential Programs, Mental
Hospital, County/City Institution, Training School, Adult or Youth Offender Facility, etc.
THE FORMS OF JUVENILE SENTENCING
Determinate Sentencing: the offender knows at least how much time they will serve
Indeterminate Sentencing: the offender knows a range of how long they might serve
Mandatory Sentencing: the judge has to sentence the offender to a certain length of a sentence
oMandatory sentencing was designed to treat people fairly and eliminate bias.
JUVENILE RECIDIVISM
Juveniles tried as adults have higher recidivism rates because
oStigmatization and other negative effects
oThe sense of resentment and injustice about being tried as adults
oThe learning of criminal behaviors in prison
oThe decreased focus on rehabilitation in the adult prison.
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