Textbook Notes (368,192)
United States (205,969)
Boston College (1,174)
History (27)
HIST 1081 (2)
Chapter 3

Canada Regime_CH3.docx

5 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 1081
Professor
Andrew Petersen
Semester
Fall

Description
CH. 3: Canada Regime Responsible Government It is stipulated that Canada is to have ‘a Constitution similar in Principle to that of the  United Kingdom’. Emergence of Responsible Government The British regime evolved through a number of different forms. 1) Absolute monarchy in its earliest stages 2) Crown turned legislature power over to their assembly, which they called  Parliament. 3) By mid­eighteenth century, the British regime was an example of separation of  powers.  - Executive power to the Crown - Legislative power to Parliament. Canada 1) Initially ruled by imperial governors appointed by the British Crown. 2) In 1748, Nova Scotia gained the right to elect legislative assemblies with authority  to legislate on most internal matters. Upper Canada (Ontario) and Lower Canada  (Quebec) received the same right late in the eighteenth century.  3) Canada has same set out as the American Constitution in separation of powers but  the difference is that Canada had a separation of powers for imperial reasons (that  is, to ensure British control) rather than for the liberal reasons advanced by  Montesquieu and Locke (protecting freedom and prevention of abuse of political  power). 4) However, separation of powers was unworkable in these colonial constitutions  because only the legislative branch was elected (unlike the American system  where each of the three branches is elected). E.g of separation of powers in  Canada failing is in 1837. Upper Canada centered on the attempts of ‘reformers’  to break the power of the so­called ‘family compact’ a small clique of wealthy  citizens who controlled much of the colony’s political and economic life.  Discontent with this constitutional order led to armed rebellions in both Upper and  Lower Canada.  5) The British government knew that some kind of reform was necessary, Lord  Durham therefore recommended the principle of responsible government for  Canada. Fundamental feature of responsible government - Executive responsible for its actions to a democratically elected legislative body.  Instead of choosing as his advisors anyone he liked, the governor would have to  choose them from among those who had been democratically elected to the  Legislative Assembly. - First introduced in Nova Scotia in 1848 and then in other colonies. The Conventions of Responsible Government (5 in total) Responsible government makes executive accountable to the House of Commons.  Therefore, it demands of those exercising executive power that they obtain the  approval of the House for their use of that power.  1) The first convention is the Crown, which still has formal title to executive  power, but will act only ‘on the advice of’ its ministers. 2) The second convention is that the Crown normally appoints as ministers or  advisers only persons who are Members of Parliament (MPs). However, there  has been a certain amount of flexibility with this rule. It is possible to appoint  people who are neither senators nor MPs. In such case, the persons appointed  must take the first possible opportunity to run for a seat in the House of  Commons, if they lose that election, they must immediately resign their  position as minister.  3) The third convention is that the ministers will act together as a team of  ‘ministry’ led by a prime minister, with each minister sharing in the  responsibility for all policy decisions made by any member of the ministry.  This is known as collective responsibility. 4) The fourth convention is that the Crown will appoint and maintain as ministers  only people who ‘have the confidence of’ (that is, the support of a majority of  members of) the House of Commons.  5) The fifth convention is that the prime minister must either resign (which  entails the resignation of the entire ministry) or request new elections, when  the House of Common expresses a lack of confidence. - Resignation clears the way for the formation of a new ministry. - Elections will resolve the problem by 2 possible results:  1) The voters will take the side of the ministry and return a new contingent of  MPs who will be more favorably disposed toward it (e.g in 2011 with the  Harper ministry)  2) The voters will take the side of the House and elect a majority of MPs who do  not support the existing ministry (e.g. in 1980 when voters elected a House  with a strong ministry of Liberal members who would not support the  Progressive Conservative ministry headed by Prime Minister Joe Clark) In Sum, these arrangements provide the kind of democratic accountability sought by  the reformers of 1837. 
More Less

Related notes for HIST 1081

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit