Textbook Notes (368,116)
United States (205,941)
Boston College (1,174)
History (27)
HIST 1081 (2)
Chapter 4

Canada Regime_CH4.docx

4 Pages
115 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 1081
Professor
Andrew Petersen
Semester
Fall

Description
CH. 4: Federalism What is Federalism? • Unitary vs. federal government o Unitary: all sovereign authority of the nation resides in one governing  body: the national government. o Federal: division between two levels of government: state & national.  Canada deals with 3: national, provincial, and municipal. Why a Federal Union? • In the 1860s, British North America consisted of 6 colonies:  o British Columbia o New Brunswick  o Nova Scotia o Prince Edward Island o Newfoundland o Province of Canada (Now Ontario and Quebec) • Each territory had its own colonial government. The gov of Province of Canada  was a failure, so they were eager to reform. o Most logical solution seemed to unite the British colonies in NA under one  government  Breakinging the deadlock in the favor of the English­speaking  colonists  Allow for productive, coordinated legislation for national  development  Security for smaller colonies. • English speakers wanted a unitary system, Quebeckers wouldn’t have it. The Original Design of the Federal Union • Parliament has exclusive jurisdiction over trade & commerce. • Residual power (anything not reserved by provincial power) is given to the  federal government. o Powers of the provincial governments are designed to be subordinate to  the federal gov.  Federal government can veto provincial legislation, this is called  disallowance. The Historical Development of Federalism in Canada • Canada is decentralized because of how the provinces & federal government have  managed their responsibilities. 1) Quasi Federalism: Strong national government, unimportant provincial  government. 2) Classical Federalism: More equal relationship between federal & provincial levels  under the Liberal Party and a Quebecker President. Each level of gov. is sovereign  in its duties. 3) Emergency Federalism: Power in hands of federal government because of need  for strong leadership. 4) Cooperative Federalism: Growing provincial financial power, responsibility,  accountability, and jurisdiction. Financing Government and Federal­Provincial Relations 1) Balance must exist between handling Federal responsibilities and maintaining  cost efficiency. a. The federal government’s ability to afford its own actions constitutes its  practical jurisdiction. b. The Canadian federal system was intentionally imbalanced in order to  favor the authority of the federal gov. over individual provinces. i. As provinces struggled with finances, stress on the federal  government necessitated the creation of fiscal federalism (3 parts): 1) Taxation a. CA 1867: federal gov. was given both a much greater ability to raise  revenues and the ability to spend money within provincial jurisdiction,  giving them clear financial authority. b. The federal gov can raise money “by any mode or system of taxation”  (section 92.2), written when people were primarily taxed indirectly. i. Indirect tax – through merchants ii. Direct tax – payed directly to federal gov. c. Because the federal government was first to establish fields of taxes, it  was difficult for the provincial governments to tax the people on top of  what they already paid toward the federal tax. This struggle is called tax  room. 2) Federal Spending Power a. Its financial supremacy over provincial governments allow the federal gov  to transcend its jurisdiction outlined in the federal division of powers, and  become involved in provincial matters like healthcare. b. The federal government will attach conditions as to how the money it  gives to the provincial governments (to do what provincial governments  ought to be doing) is spent. This is called a conditional grant. i. In response to pressure received from provinces regarding  conditional grants, the federal government has moved toward  unconditional grants, which are just large transfers of funds to each  province, allowing them more discretion as to how it is spent. 1. Accomplished through the Canada Health Transfer (CHT)  & the Canada Social Transfer (CST). For 2010, the total  transfer to the provinces through unconditional grants was  approx. $37 billion. 3) Equalization Payments a. Fed gov is responsible to aiding provinces who fall below the na
More Less

Related notes for HIST 1081

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit